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  1. #1
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    Temperature rang of cell tower equipment shelters?

    Does anyone know the allowed temperature range in the equipment shelter at the base of cell phone towers? Is it an industry standard, or depend on the equipment manufacturer?

    Thanks!!!
    Austinite

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    Does anyone know the allowed temperature range in the equipment shelter at the base of cell phone towers? Is it an industry standard, or depend on the equipment manufacturer?

    Thanks!!!
    Austinite
    Most server/electrical equipment doesn't like temps above 75. Most dedicated computer room equipment will have hot gas bypass for low suction pressures because design temps for these rooms can be as low as 60. They'll generally have humidifier systems too because low humidity causes static electrical discharges.

    Global warming is GREAT for HVAC!
    We can control fire & ice.....

  3. #3
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    Thanks!! I found the info for data centers and telecom hubs, but not for the cell tower shacks. It makes sense that it would be the same. I appreciate your help!!!
    -Austinite

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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    Thanks!! I found the info for data centers and telecom hubs, but not for the cell tower shacks. It makes sense that it would be the same. I appreciate your help!!!
    -Austinite
    No problem. This is of course a "guesstimate" at best but logically it seems consistent. What type of HVAC equipment is in the hub??

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  5. #5
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    By Hubs, I meant A-frames and larger installations, so "big ones" :-). Data centers are trying to drive down costs by allowing internal warming and using non-compressor water cooling tower systems. If you search on Google data centers, you can find some pretty interesting trends and tech on how we are cooling huge electronics farms :-).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    By Hubs, I meant A-frames and larger installations, so "big ones" :-). Data centers are trying to drive down costs by allowing internal warming and using non-compressor water cooling tower systems. If you search on Google data centers, you can find some pretty interesting trends and tech on how we are cooling huge electronics farms :-).
    By hub I meant the cell shack. Just curious if they're using a small liebert system, compu-aire, Data-aire, etc.

    Global warming is GREAT for HVAC!
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  7. #7
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    Oh, sorry :-), I have no idea, but if you Google "cell tower equipment shelter" you will find many photos of typical shacks. I'm an electrical engineer who is pushing to improve the accuracy of an internal temperature sensor on one of our products, which right now is +/- 5C. Our equipment has to shut down if it's internal temperature reaches 100C. Since the +/-5C sensor could be reading low, we have to set the trip point at 95C. But if the trip point is 95C, and the sensor is reading high, it will trip out at 90C.
    So why does that matter? Because now we have to design our cooling solution to cool the equipment to 90C instead of 100C. As you know, what is important in cooling isn't the absolute temperature, but the difference in temperature. Now in a datacenter with 30C max ambient temp, cooling to 100C is delta T of 70C, and cooling to 90C is a delta T of 60C. So I can reduce my cooling requirement 60/70 = about 15 percent by improving the accuracy of our sensor. Pretty cool :-).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    Oh, sorry :-), I have no idea, but if you Google "cell tower equipment shelter" you will find many photos of typical shacks. I'm an electrical engineer who is pushing to improve the accuracy of an internal temperature sensor on one of our products, which right now is +/- 5C. Our equipment has to shut down if it's internal temperature reaches 100C. Since the +/-5C sensor could be reading low, we have to set the trip point at 95C. But if the trip point is 95C, and the sensor is reading high, it will trip out at 90C.
    So why does that matter? Because now we have to design our cooling solution to cool the equipment to 90C instead of 100C. As you know, what is important in cooling isn't the absolute temperature, but the difference in temperature. Now in a datacenter with 30C max ambient temp, cooling to 100C is delta T of 70C, and cooling to 90C is a delta T of 60C. So I can reduce my cooling requirement 60/70 = about 15 percent by improving the accuracy of our sensor. Pretty cool :-).
    +/- 5!! Yeah, that's a serious issue. Especially when a good number of manufacturers are at +/- .5 to keep it within 1 of set point. What's your method of temperature sensing, 10k, 20k resistors? Thermostatic bulbs? Bimetal strips? Are you integrating into PC boards & if so what type of algorithms are you using? Possibly a programming issue or are you doing this strictly with relays & a digital open/closed signal opposed to an analog vDC signal??

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  9. #9
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    We use temperature sensing diodes embedded in our semiconductor devices to measure the temperature of the silicon. There are things that we can do to improve accuracy, but I have to show that our customers will appreciate the competitive advantage of saving 15 percent on their cooling solutions. Since we are talking about a device that is about 2" by 2" that produces 200+ watts of power, cooling that is expensive, which is why I am working on this.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    We use temperature sensing diodes embedded in our semiconductor devices to measure the temperature of the silicon. There are things that we can do to improve accuracy, but I have to show that our customers will appreciate the competitive advantage of saving 15 percent on their cooling solutions. Since we are talking about a device that is about 2" by 2" that produces 200+ watts of power, cooling that is expensive, which is why I am working on this.
    I've done some work in some telecommunication transformer rooms, basically a 30' x 30' room with around 400 tons of air conditioning & another 400 for redundancy in case of failure. We maintained that room at 65 +/- 1. The oddest room I worked in was a medical college morgue. The temperature could not fluctuate at all. The unit used a compressor that never turned off, it ran consistently with valves that directed the refrigerant flow. Have never seen a system like it since.
    Wish you the best of luck. Hoping the solution comes after a good night's sleep!!

    Global warming is GREAT for HVAC!
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  11. #11
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    +/- 1F is amazing!!!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    +/- 1F is amazing!!!!
    Honeywell maintains +/-.5 on their thermostats. That's why I was so surprised at +/-5. You're sensing the actual temperature of the equipment or the room??

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  13. #13
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    How so? Can you not just cool it with a closed loop glycol cooler, fan and heat sink similar to a CPU or GPU water cooler solution in high end PC'S?
    Quote Originally Posted by Austinite View Post
    We use temperature sensing diodes embedded in our semiconductor devices to measure the temperature of the silicon. There are things that we can do to improve accuracy, but I have to show that our customers will appreciate the competitive advantage of saving 15 percent on their cooling solutions. Since we are talking about a device that is about 2" by 2" that produces 200+ watts of power, cooling that is expensive, which is why I am working on this.
    Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk

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