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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    78
    Non union compensation packages vary widely from one company to another. Union compensation packages for HVAC related trades: plumber, pipefitter, refrigeration mechanic and sheet metal workers in BC can be found in their collective bargaining agreements. Click on the agreement that covers the trade you intend to pursue:

    http://www.clra-bc.com/collectiveagreements.html.
    We do it right... after lunch!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by dalec View Post
    this industry is very seasonal. just ask all the mechanics that are not getting
    their 40 hours a week, and its been that way for months with some companies

    as far as school goes, jarts or bcit. they are both private money grubbing
    businesses. jarts started out with the intention of being better than bcit
    but after interviewing with a couple of non-union contractors who stated
    they had apprentices go to both, they implied they prefer bcit.

    the members of 516 are getting screwed because the union is using training
    money to subsidise the apprentices during the school, both union and non-
    union apprentices. thats money that should be used for journeyman upgrade
    courses that used to be available.

    all that aside i think it is still a great trade but no guarantees of permanent,
    full time work from anyone. and most non-union companies are matching
    what the union contractors pay, so a guy could almost just hop across
    the fence to whatever employer is keeping the guys busy.

    oh yeah, as far as the 'pension' which is an individual rrsp plan controlled by
    the union. guys on the lower mainland get $6/hr. i think the island guys are
    higher because the last contract they wanted all the raise on the rrsp whereas all the lower mainland members put it on the wages.
    Pretty Accurate
    and in southwestern ontario its pretty slack for the most part
    Most are non union

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    686
    Seems to be a couple guys from BC on here so I'll ask.
    What are some of the best companies to work fro in BC?.By best I mean provided the best training for new techs.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Richmond, working under tarps
    Posts
    460
    Im not sure you can post specifics like that.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    686
    Quote Originally Posted by indy2000 View Post
    Im not sure you can post specifics like that.
    I did not know it would be a problem sorry.
    If anyone has any info they would like to share

    E-mail addresses not allowed in posts.

    You may put it in your profile.

    Thanks
    Last edited by k-fridge; 10-13-2010 at 10:39 PM.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    347
    From my own experience I would suggest that working for a smaller company that does a variety of work you will learn more because you will have more hands-on experience than say somebody who works for a large company that specializes in one area (like strictly commercial HVAC or supermarket refrigeration).

  7. #20

    What else can a HVAC guy be?

    I know you get Gas B ticket with HVAC. I know you can get a plumbing ticket.
    Can HVAC tech get electrical ticket? How does HVAC tech get the permission to wire compressors and HVAC units? DO you hold a limited electrical ticket as an HVAC?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    78
    Any certified trades person can pick up a subsequent trade. It is only a question of how much or if any cross program technical training or trade work experience credit is awarded.

    In British Columbia, ITA recognizes that several trades share common skills and areas of practice, and the Gasfitter "B" certification. ITA may award cross trade credit towards completing a subsequent trade - effectively shortening the number of technical training hours and work experience hours directly related to a subsequent trade.

    The Refrigeration TQ and Plumber TQ are related in that there are shared piping skills and gas and heating practice related to the Gas "B" certification. To be awarded a Plumber TQ, one requires a sponsor to attest to work experience in plumbing - not HVAC. While some plumbers and fitters with hydronic, steam and DDC experience may migrate to the HVAC industry via the Gas "B" and refrigerant handling certifications, it is unlikely a Refrigeration Mechanic migrates to plumbing. Are you seriously going to volunteer for work orders to install complete plumbing systems, replace urinals and toilets, clean drains and grease traps, replace broken drainage pipes and urinal flush valves, lay perimeter drainage, etc.?
    We do it right... after lunch!

  9. #22

    Thank you

    I am currently an aspiring 5th class power engineer. You are so right about doing work orders for urinals and toilets. Some of the work you mentioned I do regular basis currently and want to get it away from it. Really appreciate your comment, sometimes it gives you a wake up call. Anyways I am attending the big info session at BCIT this tuesday and HVAC will be covered. Hopefully I can learn something new from the department heads.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    347
    Quote Originally Posted by puzni View Post
    I am currently an aspiring 5th class power engineer. You are so right about doing work orders for urinals and toilets. Some of the work you mentioned I do regular basis currently and want to get it away from it. Really appreciate your comment, sometimes it gives you a wake up call. Anyways I am attending the big info session at BCIT this tuesday and HVAC will be covered. Hopefully I can learn something new from the department heads.
    If you want to be a refrigeration mechanic, you want to go to JARTS, not BCIT. Better instructors, higher IP pass rate, and...cheaper.

    http://www.jarts.ca

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Nova-Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    271
    um 1st class power engineers can make 110-200 in western Canada sitting in a plant. Why would you turn your back on that

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    508
    Quote Originally Posted by Armament View Post
    um 1st class power engineers can make 110-200 in western Canada sitting in a plant. Why would you turn your back on that
    Costs a fortune to do the tickets and you need plenty of years experience behind you! Also you ass is on the line as a first class.
    "Who am I? I'm the unsilent majority big mouth!" - (Paulie in Rocky 4)

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Maple Ridge, B.C.
    Posts
    131

    Puzni

    Do not take the bcit co-op program. you are much better off taking a pre app (eltt) and then persuing your apprenticeship that way. The co-op is a scam and most students end up having to got to 2nd, 3rd and 4th year anyways. (even though the co-op program is advertised and credited as an equivelent). You also have to redo your gas even though you do it as part of the co-op. I went thru the co-op program and, while it was a great way to get my foot in the door it would have been way more beneficial to just do an eltt and then start an apprenticeship.

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