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  1. #1
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    Jan 2008
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    york max e compound centrifugal

    I heard rumblings in the office today 'bouts the age of a coupla client's heat recovery machines, and that york is really the only one in the replacement consideration due to the size required. Found the specs on york's site. These machines in production? Any comments of operation? Any iom's available?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
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    Heat recovery here is done by elevating discharge temps and running at high head pressures to bring up the saturated discharge. Works great in theory, but in reality, how many centrifugals do you know of that run loaded? And when you run one unloaded, what happens to the discharge temps? On a machine that runs naturally high design discharge temps, but that has not had the design max discharge temp before alarm or shutdown increased.............. you can see where this will lead.

    Most heat recovery centrifugals did their thing by using a secondary or sidestream condenser, neither of which worked very well, based on personal experience with different mfrs, and conversations with others that had experience. Now they're trying to take a machine that uses a refgt that runs low discharge temps naturally due to the nature of the application, and make it do something it's really not designed to do. It's like a lot of other things - great concept, but a long way to go in getting it right. JMHO

    Unless for some reason they've halted production, they're being built - going on about 3 or 4 years now. I'll see if I have anything in the way of literature and get it to you if I do.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    windy city
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    4,398
    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    Heat recovery here is done by elevating discharge temps and running at high head pressures to bring up the saturated discharge. Works great in theory, but in reality, how many centrifugals do you know of that run loaded? And when you run one unloaded, what happens to the discharge temps? On a machine that runs naturally high design discharge temps, but that has not had the design max discharge temp before alarm or shutdown increased.............. you can see where this will lead.

    Most heat recovery centrifugals did their thing by using a secondary or sidestream condenser, neither of which worked very well, based on personal experience with different mfrs, and conversations with others that had experience. Now they're trying to take a machine that uses a refgt that runs low discharge temps naturally due to the nature of the application, and make it do something it's really not designed to do. It's like a lot of other things - great concept, but a long way to go in getting it right. JMHO

    Unless for some reason they've halted production, they're being built - going on about 3 or 4 years now. I'll see if I have anything in the way of literature and get it to you if I do.
    One of the machines has a split condenser (one shell). river water for heat rejection, and building heat for recovery. 1600T R11 machine does not, and i'm led to believe, has never ramped up to 100%. Machine was a Carrier special design, and when it's spinning, produces enough heat to supply the (a 45 story)building here in Chicago. Yep, it runs a higher head (15 - 20#), and the refrigerant charge is more than twice for a similar 19C series straight cooling machine.
    The other 2 in question are 17CB series R11 machines, and i'm not familar with the design or nuances of the job
    I would greatly appreciate anything on the York, iffen it's available.
    Thanks, Bob

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
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    So far the info has been kept pretty close to the vest, and there's not a lot of those things out and about, but I have been in on some troubleshooting issues with one that I know of. Got a couple of phone calls out to see if I can scare up some "common" type literature. The ones I've known of have all been specifically engineered and selected, so getting your hands on a regular IOM is like pulling teeth. I'll let you know what I find as soon as I hear back from some folks.

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