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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    154

    Hmm Aprilaire 600 or 700 humidifier?

    Does anyone know what the difference is between the 600 and 700 models? The aprilaire website specifies that the 600 has a bypass damper and the 700 has a powered fan to increase airflow...

    I am not concerned about cost, I just want the product that will work the best. My house is a split level about 2500 sq ft - desperately in need of a whole house humidifer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    91
    I DONT CARE FOR APRILAIRE UNITS. I REMOVED MY BYPASS AND INSTALLED A HONEYWELL TRUE STEAM UNIT I LOVE IT, AND HAVE HAD NO PROBLEMS SINCE, CHECK INTO IT, GOOD LUCK

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,875
    600. Air blows through water panel and into the return.

    700. Draws air from plenum and blows it through water panel and back into same plenum.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    91
    I THINK WE ALL KNOW THAT. A BYPASS IS ON THE RETURN THEN BLOWS THRU SUPPLY HOW MUCH LOSS IS THAT A 700 IS A POWER UNIT I LIKE NEITHER OF THESE APPLICATIONS MY CONTROLLER IS IN THE SPACE NOT THE RETURN PAL I SEE YOUR FANCY SITE AND I MEAN NO HARM BUT HONESTLY NO ONE KNOWS IT ALL SORRY WHY SO MUCH HATE LOST YOUR MO METER HUH TOO MUCH CONDUCTIVITY MAYBE WELL WATER HUH? NOW WHAT MORE HATE RIGHT ; YOUR NEXT SOLUTION WILL BE A REVERSE OSMOSIS SUPPY WITH HEPA FILTERS AND UV TO CONTROL IT ALL TAKE CARE MY MEAN FRIEND MERRY CHRISTMAS WHY THE HATE, DONT GET IT.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    91
    OH I SEE YOUR THE MODERATOR I DIDNT KNOW THAT YOUR NAME IS BEEN THERE BEEN WHERE ? TO ME APRILAIRE SUCKS . LOOK UP NORTEC TRUE STEAM AND OTHERS STEAM WORKS AS WELL OR IN MY OPINION BETTER I DEAL WITH CLEAN ROOMS AS WLL AS SERVER ROOMS AND MRI ROOMS NEVER SEEN ANY APRILAIRE UNIT IN THESE APPLICATIONS AND THE WAY I SEE IT IF THEY WORK THERE THEIR OK I DIDNNT KNOW RESIDENTIAL APPLICATIONS WHERE LESS IMPORTANT. SORRY FOR CARING . BUT THIS IS YOUR SITE SO APRILAIRE FOR EVERYONE ....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,875
    I answered the question asked.

    Turn off your cap locks. Its rude to anyone that reads your post. Be polite to others.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,875
    You can tout the advantages of steamers all you want.

    But, if a house is constructed tight. Or the home owner tightens up his home properly.
    Then that house shouldn't need a steam humidifier.



    PS: No brand bashing.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,824
    He's really steamed in more ways than one!
    Always here

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Quote Originally Posted by tomwk View Post
    Does anyone know what the difference is between the 600 and 700 models? The aprilaire website specifies that the 600 has a bypass damper and the 700 has a powered fan to increase airflow...

    I am not concerned about cost, I just want the product that will work the best. My house is a split level about 2500 sq ft - desperately in need of a whole house humidifer.
    If you use the 700 series, then you do not have to remember to close the damper in the summertime. Having a bypass duct between the supply and return plenums can cause operating problems on systems with poor return ducting due to short cycling.

    The preferred location is the supply plenum. Installing the 700 there means the humidity is put into the supply airstream. Warm supply air accepts humidity better than the cooler return air.

    Installing a 600 series humidifier means that the humidified air is being put into the return, usually before the filter and definitely before the heat exchanger. There is no way for the humidity to be put into the supply airstream directly. The humidifier will still work, but it will take longer. If you keep the home cool and/or have it configured to add humidity only during a call for heat, it may not work well enough.

    The 700A series can be set up to adjust the humidity automatically via an outdoor temp sensor. That is what you want, at a minimum. The controller in the box will do it.

    The top shelf system is the 700 series controlled through the Honeywell IAQ thermostat with a outdoor temp sensor. Now your humidifier is controlled at the thermostat location and a call for humidity will force the furnace fan and humidifier on without a call for heat. Nice.

    There are a couple of notable installation caveats with the True Steam setup. Ductwork SP has to be below .5" WC and there is supposed to be a 2' straight run of ducting downstream of the steam injection point. The install manual is many pages long, and it needs to be followed, or else it won't work right.

    Whatever route you go, do not use one of those self-piercing needle valves. Use a proper stop valve (like an undersink valve) with a 1/4" compression outlet. A 1/4 turn ball valve is preferred, and it won't go bad like the multi-turn valves. Yes, you may need to install a tee with a 1/2" stubout for the valve.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    154
    Thanks for all of the input. I think I will go with the 700a honeywell iaq thermostat. I didn't know that I could get a thermostat to run the fan and the humidifier without calling for heat. That is EXACTLY what I want. As long as it doesn't rust my ductwork, I think I will be very happy.

    My only other concern would be that the humidity levels would be fairly equal from room to room.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    67,875
    Make sure you have them tap into the hot water line if your going to have them set it up to humidify without a call for heat.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,837
    Beethere alluded to it but you can't/shouldn't size a humidifier if you don't know the daily leak rate on the home. If your house is 2500 sq. ft. and you have 4-people living in it, the EPA says you should not even need a humidifier if the home is optimally tight. Humidifiers adjust relative humidity. RELATIVE is the operative word there. Warm air can hold more moisture than cold air. When cold, outdoor air infiltrates the home as replacement air for that which is leaking out, the cold air has a fixed amount of water in it. When it is warmed to room temperature, it can hold more water but since it still contains the same amount as when it entered the structure, the amount it has relative to the amount is can hold at the warmer temperature goes down. In other words, if the cold air has 10-grains of water per cubic foot at 20-degrees F but could hold 20-grains, then it has a relative humidity of 50% @ 20F. Now you warm it to 70-degrees F where it could hold 20-grains of water but it still has only the original 10-grains and the relative humidity drops to 25% or roughly half of what it was at 20F. Now the air in your home is about the same driness as the Sahara desert at 25%RH. Some humidity is introduced to the warmed air through showers, cooking, sweating, clothes washing and drying, etc. These are normal household activities. If your home doesn't leak out warm air by the truckload every hour, then that moisture naturally introduced into the indoor (heated) air should be enough to keep the indoor RELATIVE humidity level at between 40% and 50% or, in other words, ideal. But if your home is leaking treated air at a higher rate than ideal, then cold outdoor air is also coming in, and that requires artificially adding moisture to the air. Thus, if you don't know the leak rate of your home, you can't determine how much moisture you need to add to the home per day or hour and it's all just guesswork and a hope that you'll hit it somewhere right. On the other hand, if you know the RH in your home is 25%, then I'd first spend a few hundred dollars on stopping the leaks first and see what happens to the RH with lower losses. Where to start? Recessed lights!! If you've got a lot of them, most leak like a seive. Airtight models will do wonders. Fireplace dampers that don's close tightly, windows and doors that could benefit from weather stripping; ceiling penetrations into the attic space (insulation is a great filter but does NOT stop air movement so never rely on firberglass insulation to stop drafts!!), garages under living spaces typically leak like crazy, particularly around the perimeter of the room floors. These are just a few of the more obvious leaks. Stop the leaks, save on energy, need less moisture added to the air, heating bills drop, house is more comfortable. How to determine leak rate? Blower door test.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    154
    I utilized a humidity sensor and it seems like most rooms in my home are at about 30% even right now - and I personally have issues with the dry heat especially in the morning - my wife and I feel like we can't breathe because its so dry. I also noticed that a lot of the caulking on my moldings has cracked. The house is 40 years old. It has newer windows, tyvek wrap, and siding and I recently added an extra layer of unfaced attic insulation running opposite the existing layers so it even covers the beams. I do have a 2 car garage under the 2nd floor bedrooms which is a weak point - the garage is very poorly insulated (but is high on my priority list to re-insulate and re-sheetrock)

    Anyway, from what I read it seems like 40-45% humidity is where I want to be - but I am no expert, and I am only going on what I have read online. I know higher than 50% starts to create serious problems and under 30% creates different problems. I would like to think that the humidifier 700a should help.

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