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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    28

    Cold climate techs: What are you wearing for gloves?

    Curious, now that it is getting colder up here in New England, what do you guys find works best for insulating the hands on the job? Obviously big thick snow gloves aren't going to work. What works for you?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    san jose,ca.
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    5,285
    MOVE where there NO SNOW

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    1,673
    Gloves with only the fingertips cut off should work well.
    I've heard that tank drivers use these, even with a 40 MPH sub-zero wind in their faces.
    Grainger doesn't seem to have these but woodcutters' supply houses may have them.

    But I've seen (women's?) gloves where you can cover or uncover the fingertips. Women's hands get colder faster so you might look for large size women's gloves with this option.

    And a hair dryer makes a good substitute for a roaring fire, as far as your hands are concerned.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,018
    I wear what ever stuff home depot/lowes have... nothing is gonna work,. too thick u can't grab stuffs and too thin ur finger r frozen. I'm yet to try those mitten where u can open and close the front for fine stuffs.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3,228
    i got a free pair from Trane last year...they only stay on from the truck to the RTU. Its bare hands from there

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbird View Post
    MOVE where there NO SNOW
    We'll all move to San Jose. There must be plenty of customers out there looking for some good old fashioned Yankee ingenuity.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    san jose,ca.
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    5,285
    Bring your hammer, help me fix these furnaces.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    newton,mass.
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    6,109
    Quote Originally Posted by gary8878 View Post
    Curious, now that it is getting colder up here in New England, what do you guys find works best for insulating the hands on the job? Obviously big thick snow gloves aren't going to work. What works for you?

    The trick is to wash your hands with cold water, they will adjust and it wont be as bad working outside.

    Many times I do not wear gloves ... that's what the flue exhaust is for ...

    I have a number of gloves depending on the type of work. I'll sometimes wear my tight work gloves, then have a pair of heavy bigger gloves and put them over the other gloves when I don't have to do in tight work. The tight gloves suck at keeping your hands warm if you are out there a long time.

    I’ll get the name of them later … I got them at J-stones.

    .


    .
    "Nothing else can poison our culture, corrupt our society or ruin the character of our people like unearned money or unearned opportunity." -- James R. Cook

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    florida
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    5,501
    Quote Originally Posted by vmc1161 View Post
    The trick is to wash your hands with cold water, they will adjust and it wont be as bad working outside.

    Many times I do not wear gloves ... that's what the flue exhaust is for ...

    I have a number of gloves depending on the type of work. I'll sometimes wear my tight work gloves, then have a pair of heavy bigger gloves and put them over the other gloves when I don't have to do in tight work. The tight gloves suck at keeping your hands warm if you are out there a long time.

    I’ll get the name of them later … I got them at J-stones.

    .


    .
    Two pair of gloves what a wussy.
    I love the smell of phosgene first thing in the morning:

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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    StL, MO
    Posts
    580
    I bought a pair of these a few years ago for offroad riding. They work as advertised.
    http://www.jrgraham.com:9081/browse....ctg_id=7108989

    FWIW, the gloves used to run about a size small - probably worth a call to verify sizing.
    Last edited by DaveCR; 12-08-2009 at 06:42 PM. Reason: added info
    UA LU 562

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    5,469
    A secret to staying cozy in winter was known long ago. It's wool. Wool glove inserts or just the gloves. Wear wool socks and sweaters. We were issued wool in the AF and while it itched at first, we got used to it in a day or two.
    Try it you'll like it.
    Cotton in summer, wool in winter. Actually, the Navaho's wore their blankets quite a bit. They were wool.
    When I used to cave some guys wore woman's pantie hose. Just don't get in an accident.
    Tracers work both ways.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    florida
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    5,501
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    A secret to staying cozy in winter was known long ago. It's wool. Wool glove inserts or just the gloves. Wear wool socks and sweaters. We were issued wool in the AF and while it itched at first, we got used to it in a day or two.
    Try it you'll like it.
    Cotton in summer, wool in winter. Actually, the Navaho's wore their blankets quite a bit. They were wool.
    When I used to cave some guys wore woman's pantie hose. Just don't get in an accident.
    vmc wear's them to.See thread http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....32#post5218932.

    I love the smell of phosgene first thing in the morning:

    To apply for professional membership click here


    Educational forums are open.

    If you would like to submit a link or an article or other related info to the EF. click here

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    I am unsure myself
    Posts
    1,116
    I bought a pair last year from marks work wearhouse. They are thin enough for most things but not all. They are a neoprene material and when wet don't really get cold and they breathe really well so you don't get wet hands from sweating. Best I have used. Paid 35 bucks or so

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