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  1. #1

    Heat Pump or RCC: What to get in DC

    Hi,

    I recently moved to DC and am wondering what the best heating/cooling system is for this climate. Currently, my place has a 2-ton heat pump that needs to be replaced, but I wanted to check with the experts before spend the money.

    DC is in Cooling Zone 2 and Heating Zone 2. The averages I looked up estimate 935 cooling hours/year and 3784 heating degree days. The high temp in summer is 93 and the low in winter is 17.

    I am concerned that the winter months in DC might be too cold for regular heat pumps, and that I might be better off with an RCC unit or "cold weather" heat pump. Price is an issue, but really I just want what is right for the space.

    All of your suggestions are really appreciated, as are any recommendations for good HVAC contractors in the area.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    Quote Originally Posted by mattyacc View Post
    Hi,

    I recently moved to DC and am wondering what the best heating/cooling system is for this climate. Currently, my place has a 2-ton heat pump that needs to be replaced, but I wanted to check with the experts before spend the money.

    DC is in Cooling Zone 2 and Heating Zone 2. The averages I looked up estimate 935 cooling hours/year and 3784 heating degree days. The high temp in summer is 93 and the low in winter is 17.

    I am concerned that the winter months in DC might be too cold for regular heat pumps, and that I might be better off with an RCC unit or "cold weather" heat pump. Price is an issue, but really I just want what is right for the space.

    All of your suggestions are really appreciated, as are any recommendations for good HVAC contractors in the area.

    Thanks!
    Well, RCC's are designed for radiant floor systems so if you have an existing heat pump that will be the way to go.

    If you have access to gas then a dual-fuel system is probably your best bet although I don't know what the gas vs electric rates are in your area. Perhaps someone in your area will chime in here.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    I live in Maryland.

    Heat pumps are fine for our climate, but you will need auxiliary heat to the pump.

    Is your house all-electric or do you have natural gas?

    What is your delivered price of electricity? Delivered price = generation + trabsmission + didtribution.

    If you have gas, what is your price (in $$ per therm or $$ per ccf)?

  4. #4
    Gary,

    Thanks for your help. The place is all electric. I'm not sure what my delivered price of electricity is because I haven't moved in yet. Right now I'm in a sublet and the owner pays utilities.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by mattyacc View Post
    Gary,

    Thanks for your help. The place is all electric. I'm not sure what my delivered price of electricity is because I haven't moved in yet. Right now I'm in a sublet and the owner pays utilities.
    OK.

    I pay 15 cents per kw-hr delivered in MD.

    Your new heat pump can qualify for the Fed Tax Credit of $1500 max if it meets 15 SEER and 12.5 EER and 8.5 HSPF. All 3 must be met to qualify.

    2 ton units can qualify easily.

    Good luck.

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