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  1. #1
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    Question Alternatives cooling technologies on the horizon?

    I searched the forum but didn't find any threads on the topic and wonder, has anyone heard anything about major manufacturers other than GE working on magnetic cooling R&D? Of the technologies being studied it seems magnetocoloric alloys would have the best chance at commercialization.

    There's a little blurb on LSU's website about their research and it mentions that local investors are involved. I'd assume the investors are there to fund work aimed at growing the IP to a point where it can be licensed.
    (Google "lsu item75836" to see the article)

    And GE put out a few videos a while back that show R&D work being done in the lab.
    (Google "GE Magnetic Refrigeration: How it Works" to see video)

    Sorry about not posting direct links, I'm still restricted due to being 'new' on the forum. I'll update the post as soon as I'm permitted.

    Adam

  2. #2
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    Is this anything like the Pelletear cooling?

  3. #3
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    No, not really, it's more similar to the vapor compression cooling we're all familiar with than it is to solid state Peltier (it's French so I assume it's pronounced something like 'pelt ee ay').

    The details are vague regarding what was done at LSU but the basic principal is that there are alloys that when exposed to a magnetic field they change temperature.
    Last edited by snadam; 04-23-2015 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Removed redundant stuff

  4. #4
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    I dont know much about that. Here's a nice article I read this morning on heat exchanger efficiency potentially going up in the near future thanks to something something tobacco. Seems like it could really help in the coils of our DX systems to push those SEER numbers through the roof.

    http://phys.org/news/2015-03-viruses...ation.html#jCp

  5. #5
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    Something worth pointing out is that the LSU research I mentioned earlier (linked here) didn't actually discover the phenomenon instead they found an alloy with suitable thermal properties, ie. its temperature range is suitable for replacing common refrigerants. The discovery of alloys that heat when exposed to a magnetic field and cool when the field is removed was discovered over 100 years ago IIRC.

    Here's that video I referenced earlier and a fluffy non-technical post on the GE website.



    Based on what I see in the GE video I'm thinking it works something like this...

    refrigerant phase change magnetocoloric
    01 compress vapor refrigerant - exothermic expose alloy to magnetic field - exothermic
    02 dissipate heat energy via the evap coil dissipate heat energy via liquid heat exchange loop
    03 allow refrigerant to evaporate and absorb heat from environment remove magnetic field and absorb heat from liquid in (a different???) embedded exchange loop
    04 repeat cycle repeat steps

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