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  1. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    Well, if you don't have a clear grounding in vapor compression refrigeration theory and application, you're reduced to winging it. You might get lucky, you might lose one or more compressors before you do, you might not get there at all.

    The beer, as it ferments in each chamber, I'm assuming it is in liquid form? If so, and if it is open to the cabinet, it will be a constant source of moisture to condense on any cooling coil within each cabinet. Evaporation slows at low temperatures, but does not stop. I also must ask if the fermenting process itself generates heat, as one would find in, say, a compost pile, fermenting anaerobically. In addition to the fixture temp you want in each chamber, any heat generated by blowers, lights, and the fermenting process must also be factored in.

    Doggone engineering again!!
    Fermentation is a highly exothermic process; at the height of fermentation, the beer is as much as about 4 degrees F warmer than ambient. The beer is sealed off; it is very important that fermenting beer is not exposed to oxygen (yeast can reproduce anaerobically and aerobically, the latter being undesirable). So that won't be a concern.

    What I need to do is find someone who knows what they are doing who can help me in exchange for beer

    Anyone in the Dallas, TX area willing to help me out for a few cases of homebrew?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,347
    If you want it done right it'll cost you more than some homebrew.

    If you're really serious about this, take a basic refrigeration class at a local community college, and pick the instructor's brain when he starts talking about mass flow rates and pressure-enthalpy charts.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  3. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    If you want it done right it'll cost you more than some homebrew.

    If you're really serious about this, take a basic refrigeration class at a local community college, and pick the instructor's brain when he starts talking about mass flow rates and pressure-enthalpy charts.
    Yes, I was joking. Sort of.

    Good thought on taking a class, though I need to get this done quickly.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jax Fl.
    Posts
    1,943
    Your best solution to a variable temp mutli station process control system would be to make a sealed glycol chilling tank with:

    Internal passive cooling coil or a pump driven serpentine or plate heat exchanger. Cooling of Glycol would be controlled by a simple aquastat.

    Secondary loop pump.

    The multi-step sealed compartments could either use passive internal glycol coils [food-grade Prop Gly] or passive externally wrapped glycol coils. No internal copper allowed due to the sulphur [copper sulfate] or reacting with the acidic CO2.

    Each step would need it's own three way mixing valve/AO DDC controller.

    Insulation as necessary and a freezestat is recommended. Make sure you use a food grade dye on the Glycol to detect product contamination.

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