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  1. #1
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    BTU's in a candle.

    I want to find out how many BTU's there are in a candle. My first thought is to weigh a candle then use it to heat one pound of water one degree then extinuish and weigh the candle again. I should then know grams of candle wax per BTU. Will this be fairly accurate?

  2. #2
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    Dec 2004
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    newton,mass.
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    Are you even allowed to have matches ...


    Oh, I think there are other factors involved ... type or material the candle is of ... it's size ... a narrow one would burn faster and with more waste ... I think.

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  3. #3
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    I want to get candles made of bees wax, soy wax and paraffin wax of the same size and then get a aluminum pie tin to help with heat transfer.
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  4. #4
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    one question.......WHY???
    You that bored or James not keeping you busy enough?
    Sheesh!
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  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbleheadski View Post
    one question.......WHY???
    You that bored or James not keeping you busy enough?
    Sheesh!
    He wants to save money on his heating bill this winter. And needs to find out how many thousands of candles he needs to buy.
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  6. #6
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    Aug 2009
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    In thoery that should be right, but how do you figure for the heat that is lost to the air that doesn't warm the water.

    On another note, as stated before.....WHY?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger93rsl View Post
    I want to find out how many BTU's there are in a candle. My first thought is to weigh a candle then use it to heat one pound of water one degree then extinuish and weigh the candle again. I should then know grams of candle wax per BTU. Will this be fairly accurate?
    Use 10 candles and divide by 10. Since some heat will be lost to the air, the value you get will be the minimum heat output in BTU/hr of a candle.
    If the water volume is nearly spherical in shape it will have the minimum heat loss to the air.

    Another way is to use the specific heat of a candle flame [equal to that of air?] and its temp [600-1400C].

  8. #8
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    or
    you could put the candle under one pound of water and see haw long it takes to raise the temperature one degree ???????????????
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  9. #9
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    and ofcourse the specific heat of water is one!
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    there are 252 calories in a btu
    it takes 252 calories to raise the temperature of one pound of water at or around its boiling point one degree farenheit in one hour 252 x 60= 15,120------- 15,120 calories per hour x 24 hours = 362,880 calories in a ton of refrigeration
    funny it takes 362,880 calories to melt a ton of ice
    there is about a thousand calories in a scoop of rocky road ice cream!!!
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  11. #11
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    oh!
    those are all just numbers i pulled out of my head from a long time ago
    they should be close
    i am 100% sure about the ice cream though
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  12. #12
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    Sep 2004
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    actually since the latent heat of fusion is 144 btus 144 x 252=36,288

    it would take 36,288 calories to melt one pound of ice cream even rocky road!

    Quote Originally Posted by supertek65 View Post
    oh!
    those are all just numbers i pulled out of my head from a long time ago
    they should be close
    i am 100% sure about the ice cream though
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Were those Calories or calories? 1 Calorie = 1000 calories.

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