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  1. #14
    Originally posted by James 3528
    Hate to say this, but you should plan for that. On new construction I disable the airhandlers until I want to start them.
    My HVAC contractor offered to start the system so the drywall guys would have nice comfortable air, and I had learned enough from this forum to ask him not to. Told this to the drywall guy, and he turned even whiter than the drywall mud he was covered in, and said, "We don't EVER allow the HVAC contractors to turn on a system! We don't want to pay for having it replaced!".

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902
    Yea, screw the drywall guys.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Topeka Ks
    Posts
    15

    Angry

    in our area this is a constant problem every year, 92% furnaces are the worst, the dust will plug up the secondary heat exchanger.
    our local engineers allow temporary use of new equipment into the spec's amd then make us responsible to clean the equipment and duct if it gets dirty! We end up the babysitters. We are trying to get them to change their spec's but no luck so far.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5
    Originally posted by threeputt6
    our local engineers allow temporary use of new equipment into the spec's amd then make us responsible to clean the equipment and duct if it gets dirty! We end up the babysitters.
    That ain't right. If they get it dirty, then cleaning it should never come out of your company's pocket. Too bad the engineers are screwing you this way. I don't know what can be done about it, but it is not a good practice.

    I work for a owner/operator (there are just the two of us) that does all of a certain builder's homes, among other jobs. This builder insists upon having heat as soon as possible in fall and winter so that the drywallers, painters, and carpet layers can have heat in the cold weather. They do use reddy heaters when we haven't got the electric mains hooked up yet, but anytime after that we are expected to provide the heat. This builder now builds total electric homes, so we don't have to worry about dust in the draft inducer motor or anything, but the cabinet and duct system collects tremendous amounts of dust and the HO simply inherits the dust when they move in. This is how they think it should be done and how we are expected to do it. My boss goes along, since he doesn't want to lose their business. He is well past retirement age, yet wonders why I don't want to take over his operation lock and key. It's because I don't want to inherit his customers! His standards are often well below my own, even though he believes he is always doing a good job (our jobs are above average quality for this area). Running a brand new system in these conditions is simply not fair to the real customer, which is the HO. I have to just accept it, though.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    288
    that is a job that can end up haunting you for a while with callbacks. as long as it's understood that each callback is billable I guess.

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