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  1. #1

    Oil boiler: System 2000 vs. Buderus vs. Pensotti

    Hi All,

    I have an oil boiler / hot water baseboard (fin copper pipe; 5 zones including one for indirect hot water), with a 40-gallon SuperStor indirect hot water heater. I live in Massachusetts and use about 1000 gallons/year in a 2300 sq. foot house. After getting a handful of quotes, and after doing much reading here and elsewhere on the web, it seems that the best choice would be either System 2000 or a triple-pass cast iron boiler with outdoor reset. (People can feel free to correct me if I am wrong about this.) Accordingly, I am down to three choices:

    - System 2000 EK-1 with Riello burner -- $ estimate -- all other parts removed and replaced;
    - Buderus G115 (5-section) with Riello burner and Logamatic outdoor reset ($) -- Taco circulator pumps stay, but relays will be replaced with a Taco multi-zone relay with priority for hot water; and
    - Pensotti Quatech DK2-5 with Riello burner and outdoor control ($) -- Taco circulator pumps stay, but relays will be replaced with a Taco multi-zone relay with priority for hot water.

    Manual J heat loss calculation of about 80,000 BTU. Measuring by baseboard yields output of about 130,000 BTU.

    I am inclined to go with System 2000 as I understand it will save me much more on fuel than either the Buderus or Pensotti set-ups would. Please let me know your recommendations.
    Last edited by beenthere; 10-16-2009 at 05:42 AM. Reason: Removed prices

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,568
    Something is wtong with the calcs unless you have a farm house. I have never seen a home your size need a boiler this big, tighten up your home. Manual J says 80K, install 80K and put priority on the water tank.

    Do another heat loss on your home, good program here on this site.

    No way with 1000 gallons per year you need the boiler quoted. Look into the G115/3 or maybe 4, your hot water load does not occur the same time as the big heat loss.

    Get the smallest Buderus they make would be my recomendation.

    The smaller the boiler the better the efficiency, get rid of the pricing
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  3. #3

    Thanks for your reply

    Thanks for your reply. I'm confused -- some dealers have wanted to size based on baseboard output (130K BTU), while others have wanted to size based on Manual J (85K BTU). What's the right approach?

    Also, should I look at IBR or DOE for the right boiler sizing?

    Thanks again!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    701
    You boiler size should be done on a heat loss for your house, the only time I size for radiation is for steam systems.

    I've recently been installing the Solaia boiler with a Superstor indirect, it's a little less than the Buderus but so far very reliable and a good performer.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boston MA.
    Posts
    202
    The Net IBR is the magic number. the G115-4 is 95000btu's and would be the right boiler as long as the load calc was done properly........When they measured the baseboard did they check to see if it actually had a heating element inside? some of it might just be "dummy baseboard."

  6. #6
    Thanks for all of the replies!

    They measured the "finned" baseboard -- i.e., no dummy baseboard.

  7. #7

    One more question....

    It sounds like the consensus is to get the Buderus?

    I had been leaning toward the System 2000 for more efficiency. I understand that the System 2000 would provide about 10-15% additional savings versus the Buderus or Pensotti.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    11
    Well has anyone approached you with the Buderus GB125BE oil condensing boiler? www.buderus.net look there on the AFUE ratings and see what they have to offer. Also your paying for a warranty up front so get the longest and most easiest one you can get. Efficiency is a good start to look into but the reliability of Buderus is unmatched in m y eyes.
    You will most likely use alot gallons of oil too.
    Just a thought.

  9. #9
    Hi. I did not consider a condensing boiler because none of the 5 or 6 heating contractors who have looked at our house suggested one. I'd be worried that few people would know how to service a condensing oil boiler. Am I right or wrong about this?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    11
    Call more people then and look at all your options. Just because they dont use it doesn't mean someone else doesn't either. if you can save another7-10% on your oil bill for shopping around more wouldn't that make you happy

  11. #11
    I have similar situatioin as transfercase, but am adding 600sf to the home and use old vicotrian radiators. I plan to use radiant floor (pex) for the new space on sep zone. Based on responses so far, it sounds like condensing Buterus is the way to go. However, I am open to converting to nat gas. Any thoughts?
    can transfercase share the quotes with me?
    Last edited by Stamas; 11-06-2010 at 06:59 PM. Reason: email

  12. #12
    Having spoken and gotten proposals from 5-6 contractors, my wife is going to kill me if I say we need to start new and start getting estimates for a condensing boiler. Doesn't the System 2000 literature -- i.e., the Brookhaven lab study -- say anyway that their type of system would be more efficient than a condensing boiler?

    Also, I have sent e-mail to bostondave with my contact information to discuss.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    11
    I know your wife will kill you but the Oil prices can climb at anytime as with anything else. If your choose the condensing boiler with high efficiencies you think your wife will kill you when SHE can go buy shoes instead of oil like her neighbors without the new high tech high effinciency boiler. lol Trust me I understand your point but the future is in the condensing products and it will save you tons in the end but costs more upfront obviously.

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