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  1. #1

    convection blower on pellet burner

    Anyone have an idea what the cfm rating on the convection blower mounted on a Quadrafire Mt. Vernon pellet stove might be. Thinking of installing a remote blower for convection air movement (mostly to quiet things down) and it'd be nice to have a good idea to keep the same airflow. I would be adding one 90 degree elbow and about 2 feet of straight run and would use 4" diameter ducting. The data tag on the existing blower motor is J238-150-15263 115V 3.0 A 3000 RPM, for what it's worth.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,143

    Question Huh?

    I'm not understanding what you're contemplating. You speak of a convection blower then discuss 4" 'ducting'. Are you talking about the exhaust or convection blower? You cannot rig any sort of warm air duct to the stove without voiding the warranty. If you want to move the stove, which will require additional pipe, then you need to refer to the venting charts in the listed instructions.

    Can you clarify what you intend?
    TIA,

    Hearthman

  3. #3
    I'd be removing the convection blower from the back of the stove and mounting a blower on the other side of the wall right behind the stove. I've made up a plenum for the back of the stove to take the place of the convection blower. Planning on running a 4" pipe thru the wall from blower to plenum. This will circulate air thru the house on the main level also. Just looking for the cfm for the convection blower. thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,143

    Thumbs down bad idea

    Modifying the listed stove will void the warranty and listing. Also, without the proper airflow through the stove, it will overheat and shut down. Do not do this. It is a bad idea. If you need additional heat into an adjoining space, you can use a through-the-wall fan but not connected directly to the stove and most certainly not by cobbling some homemade contraption out of a perfectly good stove.

    When you duct forced hot air into an adjoining space, it become HVAC for which you need to pull a permit and have it inspected. If you live in Philly, you would need a "warm air license".

    BTW, as this is also a violation of the building and fire codes, your modification would void your homeowner's insurance.

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