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  1. #14

    Wink Have you tried Ductape???

    Jus kidding ........

    Johnstone Supply carries a Pan Epoxy Patch kit which consists of a two part goop which is said to seek it's own level in a drain pan.

    Possibly you could goop this stuff on the areas which are leaking.

    I like the welding idea the best though.

    My personal sugestion is to go with a gas shielded SS MIG unit. Or you can have the pan TIG Welded, heli arc.

    Wish they made a Dactape loaded with some stick-um which would adhere to most anything.

    Tsk, tsk...... maybe in the near future....

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    The duct tape wouldn't be bad. I am really wishing for just a simple stick like they had in Harry Potter. Ala cazaam, plug hole.

    And charge 15,000 grand a wand wave.


  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    603
    For a temporary fix..like a couple of years we used to drill a 1/4 in hole and put a a 1/4 in bolt and nut with rubber washers . use only stainless steel worked very good and can be done quite a few times!

    when in diubt... Punt!

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,586
    I have done just what you did Shotgun.....still that way 2 years later.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    603
    freezeking, I would say is's the fastest and cheapest way out...ya think? We had another process we would use when the building was built around the condenser(you know what I mean) If the pan was the only problem we would raise the condenser, cut the legs out, remove old pan, have sheetmetal make up anotherS.S. pan with legs to install after pan was in place and Vuolla' it was good for another life time. This procedure was done only if the existing condenser was worth it, if not, we would call in terrosts to blow up the mechanical room and then they would have to spend money, of course thats not tru but I have been known to accidentally put in too much acid cleaning liquid and have the entire coil section fall down. I was always looking for a way to improve working conditions for our clients(Civil service). I always took great pride in having the best area in the district.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    103
    Is this tank subject to vibration? SS work hardens with flexing and or vibration easly. And cracks as a result. This should be a walk in the park to weld. Are these holes or cracks. If they are pin holes I would bet they are the tip of t he ice-berg. Look for epoxy sloshing compound used for gas tanks to line it with, I have used this as a bandaid before. If this is a very big tank at all I would get a liblity waver before you do ANY repair. CYA.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,166
    Did the weld repair work?
    That is the only way to a confident, billable repair all the other suggestions are "mickey mouse". You would not gear clamp a piece of rubber over a refrig. pinhole leak!
    Stainless steel is remarkably fusible and it is most likely that the leak has occured on a weld seam and is easily rewelded!
    How's that tank?
    Watts New, Ohm My, I been Electrically Commutated. Are U2.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I did it myself. On Tuesday. Simple as can be. I laid it out like this. I can patch it and then as things get worse we can explore replacement. It's a done deal boss. She is dry as a bone.

    I did convince them to start using a professional water treatment outfit.

    It is crazy that it's rusting after 7 years. Recold wants nothing to do with it. Typical.

  9. #22

    Cool

    Okay.

  10. #23
    I have done a few tower sumps with fiberglass and they last a while but over time the fiberglass usually lets go of the sheetmetal and then you have a floating bowl inside the sump. I don't know if you are a car buff but there is a product out there called POR-15 that is made for sheetmetal repair and corosion prevention and is great for this type of repair. Used it a few months ago on a 400 ton condenser water cooler for a chiller that was leaking pretty bad. Also used it on the sub-frame on my 69 Camaro and all of the floor boards and trunk pan. The stuff cures plyable but is pretty bullet proof. Metal does not have to be spotless just free of loose debris and rust scale. If this does not sound like the ticket for you then I would either spot weld the leaks or weld in patch panels. Forget the fiberglass. Too messy and it will cook your brain inside the confines of the tower.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    603
    If we were pressed for time we would drill a hole to clear the leak then use SS bolt,nut, 2 SS washers 1 top,1 bottom and 2 neopreem gaskets, top & bottom cut a little larger then the washers. These would last for years

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