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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I have an evaporative condenser for a rack system I have. Condenser on roof. The water resevoir where pump and hold tank are is in rack room. The stainless steel hold tank is leaking. In a few spots, on bottom, only accesible by draining tank and crawling inside.. The manufacturer is Recold, there out of California. I said stainless, but the damn thing is lightly rusting. No room whatsoever to even quickly thinking of replacing, no way with out busting down a brick wall the room sits in. The room was built around the equipment with out any thought of future service work. Is there a way to line it, or should I see if I can get a welder to patch. Or is it just better to tear down the brick wall and replace. I have to come up with several ideas and bid it out, so that the executives to this place have it in the budget for the coming year.

    Recold tells me to call there in town local distributor, and I quote, "they have their own guys and they can take care of that for you". Yeagh right. I need to eat too.

    Any of you gurus been down this road?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    St Louis MO
    Posts
    1,382
    I would bet my 1st born ,naw , all 3 of em that Recold would/will patch it if the tank has good overall stuctural integrity other than the defect.
    I would think the cost of repair over replace in this situation would demand repair , but I did like the sound of DEMOLITION and its COOL power and pneumatic tools.

    ~ I'm a certified welder though and this might just make this a prejudiced post ~

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    St Louis MO
    Posts
    1,382
    BTW Dowwa , how is the weather in MI???
    Bettin its still windy as hell like I left it.
    The wind off that lake had to be the coldest sh** I ever had to endure on a rooftop.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,543
    I have used fiberglass to repair the tanks you describe before. Empty, dry and many gallons of resin and alot of matting. If you use enough rardner and have some heat you could plobably start it back up in an hour or two.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    St Louis MO
    Posts
    1,382
    I've used the fiberglass too with great results , but to be in and out in 2 hrs makes me think you were an autobodyman in one of your previous lives .

    I'd tell ya to rent a mig welder for stainless, or better yet , just buy the damn thing and you got a brand new Custom Kitchen Hood Shop.

    It's a " piece a cake " . After you weld, grind and buff a few welds , you'll be an expert too !

    BTW @ 300 bux for a gas free,auto feed mig , you cant go wrong learning something new and giving that client " the professional touch " with any stainless steel or light metal welding .

    [Edited by Wannamakeice on 11-14-2003 at 09:53 AM]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,081
    I would opt for the fiberglassing of the tank as well. I've done a number of drain pans recently but nothing as big as a tower sump tank since I 'glassed my boat when I was in high school.

    If you're not experienced in this kind of stuff, there are outfits that specialize in it. Check out the local boat shops and I'll bet you'll get pointed in the right direction to somebody to give you a quote.

    If the fiberglass patch isn't what you're looking for, check out sectional prefab tank structures. I don't know offhand who makes them but I've seen knocked-down sections that get gasketed and bolted together on site. That would have to be cheaper than blowing holes in the wall.

    Maybe Wanna will weld one up for ya'with his MIG.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    You can repair small cracks in that tank with staybrite #8 and a good liquid acid flux like Stay Clean.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,166
    My only simillar exp. was with a s/s ice cream pastuerizer that had cracks at the existing welds on the water jacket.
    We tried a s/s epoxy and were unsuccessful, Did'nt try the fiberglass method but cracks were repaired after 2-3 attempts by a s/s welder.

    Stainless welding is tricky but interesting, easy to learn though + low amperage and clean work. I would recommend a repair done by welding for a permanent solution.
    Watts New, Ohm My, I been Electrically Commutated. Are U2.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,886
    They also make a liquid stainless steel. It's like epoxy but it's ment for stainlees steel. This stuff is easy to apply and works real good.
    Not what it use to be

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    phoenix, arizona
    Posts
    1,117
    Originally posted by condenseddave
    You can repair small cracks in that tank with staybrite #8 and a good liquid acid flux like Stay Clean.

    ditto above.


    brass work good also. last a long long time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    254

    Talking I like lmtd's idea

    Call Rhino linings and never worry about it rusting again.

    All joking aside, it may be worth it to look into coatings so that you don't have to do the same thing for the five years.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,895
    Fiberglass or epoxies are only good for a patch and they need time to dry. a good welder to repair or depending on the tank bending up a new base to fit inside it and a good bead of welding around the edges would be a more long term repair.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I had the tank empty the other day to take a look. Just a few holes. I think the first go round on this is going to be a simple patch weld. Take no time and we get the thing to stop leaking. This customer is paying dearly right now for other discoveries I have made about there system.

    I got a buddy who is in business as a welder for himslef and he claims he can do it no problem.

    In a few years I am sure it will be worse and then maybe we can look at something more in depth. The integrity of most of it is solid. It's leaking at weld seams. Not on a flat peice of stock, where a rusted hole worked itself through.

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