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  1. #1

    Cold or Hot water supply for fridge ice maker?

    I am remodeling my house and want to add a water supply for a fridge that has a ice maker. I was told to run a hot water supply to the fridge not cold. How true is this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Western PA
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Sounds dumb to me.

    Waste of energy on both ends, really.
    Sorry could you explain a little more to me thanks?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Energy is required to change the temperature of the water, whether up OR down.

    SO, you use energy to heat it, then use energy again to cool it back down again.

    Just use cold water and be done with it.

  5. #5
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    burlington county n.j.
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    9,709
    the small amount of water going into a domestic fridge ice maker would probably be room temperature just from sitting in the line waiting to be used whether hooked to hot or cold.


    i would still hook up to cold water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    44
    Just curious but who told you to use hot water?
    ccnova

  8. #8
    A buddy said it says on a new fridge he bought.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    831
    From what I've read SUPPOSEDLY the reason behind hooking it up to a hot water supply is that the water heater will act as a bit of a filter to deal with sediment in the water and because of its infrequent use, the water reaching the unit will generally be room temperature anyways.

    Another source I saw said that it will make the ice cubes clear as opposed to cloudy. News to me. Hot water can contain something like 900 BTUs per pound if I remember correctly. Sounds like that poor evaporators going to have a hot pull down ahead of it lol.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    ABQ. NM
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    35
    Some replies never cease to amaze me. Almost as bad as the argument that filling up your car in the morning with gas will give you better yields as opposed to filling it up in the evening. Just run cold water. The greater the temperature difference the faster the rate of heat exchange. No need to make the vapor pump run any harder than it needs to.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ.
    Posts
    14

    hot water for ice

    years ago an engineer for I.B.M. used hot water to "fill" ice trays and tupperware to make cubes and blocks. his reasoning was two fold, clarity of the finished cube and the faster rate of heat transfer, thus quicker ice.
    if a guy could find an old ice cube tray it would be worth a 6-pack of experimentation.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    933
    cold water , why add load to the box?
    Still learning opinions welcome.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    706

    Hmm cold water supply used

    Cold water supply is used to supply a domestic household refrigerator, for the icemaker & water dispenser. The icemaker only uses 4 ounces of water to fill the tray. Here is a list of reasons for not using hot water supply.
    1. water dispenser will dispense cold water at first then nice & fresh hot water. good for quenching your thirst on a hot day!
    2. most of the water supply tubing in the refrig. is poly-tube, routed through the refrigerated side to a reservoir tank. tank is also poly tubing. running large amounts of hot water through these refrigerated lines (since they are inside the refrigerated space) is asking for a flooded kitchen, because you know it will burst when you are not at home!
    3. why even bother with the line, sure run the line for the future owners - I have mine hooked-up to my stand alone water dispenser. 3 gallon bottle capacity - has an Ό" compression fitting outlet just for this purpose.

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