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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2
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    Exclamation vortexing- introduction

    Hello,

    Please call me Chlorophil7. I am 17 and a student in my second year of MCTC's HVAC program. I am excited about learning this trade! I have participated in Skills USA, and went to nationals this year. I am also a student member of RSES.

    This semester I am taking a class on commercial A/C. Next week we have to have the answers to the questions for Unit 49 (Cooling Towers and Pumps) from our book, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning, sixth edition.

    Anyway, I was able to understand every question, except I found question 11 to be confusing. It asks: "Vortexing in a cooling tower occurs in the _____." Then it gives four possible answers.

    A. inlet piping
    B. basin of the tower
    C. outlet of the piping
    D. pump discharge

    I have read the whole unit, and I know the answer is not C. or D, but I am confused if they mean the inlet of the pump by inlet piping. If they do, the the answer could be both A. and/or B.

    Could someone please tell me which one should I choose, and why?

    Thank you in advance.

    Cheers,
    Chlorohil7

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    S.C.
    Posts
    942
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    I would say the basin of the cooling tower. Not positive

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jax Fl.
    Posts
    1,944
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    Basin of the tower. It is caused by the Coriolis effect due to not enough liquid head above the strainer/inlet to the tower. You would increase your basin level to help prevent it so that you don't suck in air.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,472
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRINJAX View Post
    Basin of the tower. It is caused by the Coriolis effect due to not enough liquid head above the strainer/inlet to the tower. You would increase your basin level to help prevent it so that you don't suck in air.
    I wish test questions like this one had a more practical aim than theoretical. Instead of just asking where vortexing might occur in a cooling tower, ask the test taker if he understands the consequences of vortexing. If you know what vortexing is you'll know where it will occur and what the consequences of it might be.

    Example:

    Which of the following reasons best describes why vortexing is to be avoided in cooling tower operation?

    A. In order that tower water chemistry is maintained
    B. To prevent pump cavitation
    C. To prevent tower sump outlet from ingesting air
    D. To keep condenser water turbidity to a minimum

    As a test writer/intructor I'd be more interested in knowing if the student knows WHY he picked the correct answer, not just that he can.

    Oh, and chlorophyll17, welcome to the site! I started in the HVAC trade when I was 16 and have been at it more or less ever since. It's been a great ride so far, and I've learned more just in the past several years than I thought possible. Stick around and participate!
    Building Physics Rule #1: Hot flows to cold.


    Building Physics Rule #2:
    Higher air pressure moves toward lower air pressure


    Building Physics Rule #3:
    Higher moisture concentration moves toward lower moisture concentration.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Under my tree
    Posts
    5,044
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    Basin of the tower. A weir setup will stop it from vortexing.
    Not much to say, just hanging in my shade tree!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2
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    Smile Thank you.

    Thank you for the help everyone.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The Great country of Texas
    Posts
    429
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    Good example, "flush the toliet and watch!" Basin.
    "I'm from Texas, what country are you from?"

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