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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,095
    No prices, not even upgrade.

    Already deleted them.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Quote Originally Posted by FirstHomeBuilt View Post
    okay, I will be the first to admit that I am fairly handy, I will be installing the kitchen cabinets and the flooring, But the most I know about HVAC is how to use the thermostat. What is a heat load calc?

    The equipment will have its own room in the basement, center of house. Is there a location that you HVAC people would prefer?
    A good heat load calc (Manuals J and D) provides you with the info you need to size and provide proper air flow to your home. Most GC's know. ALL architects and HVAC types know.

    Location just needs to allow ease of access and service. Middle of basement is probably good.
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

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    Proud member of KA Club

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    Spend the majority of your money in windows, insulation, a good vapor barrier that is sealed around the permitter of the entire wall, ceiling and corners thru out the entire house.

    If you have the funds go with foam insulation and also include the attic roof deck, encapulate the entire attic space if possible.

    Be sure all penatration thru all plumbing, electrical, ceilg fixtures, are all sealed.

    As for windows I would go with Double hung's easier to clean from the inside.

    Again if it's in your budget include a porch around the south and West sides of the home for shading from the hot sun during the summer months will cut down on your heat load in the summer.

    Be sure there's atleast 2"-4" of foam insulation around the permititer of the foundation prior to back filling.

    Make sure they seal the skirt and sill around the perimeter of the foundation.

    If you do not have the house insulated with foam, be sure to then have 3/4" foam insulation bd. on the exterior of the house along with Tyvek and that all seams are taped properly. you can also include the tyvek house wrap to go up and over the roof and under the soffits of the home as well.

    for more information go to buildingscience.com there's a wealth of information where they provide many different scenarios depending on your climate and zone your in. Very good info to read and put into your home that will pay you back 10 fold if implemented and installed properly where you can then heat your home with a few candles.

    Be sure to include either a HRV/ERV for proper ventilation of all areas of the home including Bath's, kitchens, laundry, and living areas.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    6

    ductwork

    Here's what they are using for ductwork.

    The duct work is Rectangular galvanized metal with 6" solid metal supply tubes for the heat runs. We use primarily hard surface pipe and not flexible.

    Is this good?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    6" is typical for the average however in some cases you may need some 8" duct runs but that's far and few between. Be sure they also install dampers on all the supply runs so that after the install is complete the entire system can then be balanced to get the proper air flow to all the rooms so they all are conditioned evenly. If any of the supply runs go in thru a crawl space be sure everything in that area is insulated this should include any runs in the attic space to be insulated as well.

    One last item, be sure either you or they seal the entire duct work with a mastic and metal tape to seal the duct work to ensure you have the best possible air flow, should include the return duct work also.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Location:Raleigh NC
    Posts
    9,625
    Quote Originally Posted by FirstHomeBuilt View Post
    Here's what they are using for ductwork.

    The duct work is Rectangular galvanized metal with 6" solid metal supply tubes for the heat runs. We use primarily hard surface pipe and not flexible.

    Is this good?
    Yes that good
    the size in determined by the Manual D.

    If you want to go all the way wrap the duct work
    If you help others then you are a Success

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Location:Raleigh NC
    Posts
    9,625
    Quote Originally Posted by DanW13 View Post
    6" is typical for the average however in some cases you may need some 8" duct runs but that's far and few between. Be sure they also install dampers on all the supply runs so that after the install is complete the entire system can then be balanced to get the proper air flow to all the rooms so they all are conditioned evenly. If any of the supply runs go in thru a crawl space be sure everything in that area is insulated this should include any runs in the attic space to be insulated as well.

    One last item, be sure either you or they seal the entire duct work with a mastic and metal tape to seal the duct work to ensure you have the best possible air flow, should include the return duct work also.
    good point
    If you help others then you are a Success

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,179
    Option 2 or 4. Straight electric is nuts. 2 at least gives you a heat pump for a considerable electric bill savings. If you want gas, dual fuel in your climate is wise.

    Ditto on the foam insulation. BUT make sure equipment is sized right. It is so tight that the heating & cooling needs are greatly reduced over conventional insulation. Too many size by sq ft and will oversize such a tight house.

    www.energywisestructures.com can size equipment on such a house and guarantee utility bills.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,443
    IN a tight home in green grass climate, you need mechanical fresh air ventilation with supplemental dehumidification. Check out the a small ventilating dehumidifier like a Ultra-Arie 65H. These units will provide fresh air to the home and maintain <50%RH during wet cool weather when there is low/no cooling load. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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