Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 40

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,800

    Rheem heat pump water heater

    Anybody work on these yet? I'm curious what you do with the cold air that results from heating the water. The brochure says the unit exhausts the cold air. Looking at the spec sheets, I don't see anything about exhausting anything.

    http://www.rheem.com/Products/tank_w...hpwhhomeowner/
    A Veteran is a person, who at some point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to the United States of America for payment up to and including their life.
    Gene Castagnetti-Director of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Colorado flatland native
    Posts
    15,067

    Well, Doc......

    I sold one, still waiting for delivery...... I'll let ya know. In my opinion, it's gonna be great to dehumidify a damp basement, but you and I both know the furnce will have to replace in the winter the btu's absorbed into the heater. In the summer, I expect a cooooley basement. Says w-htr room has to be kinda big. Maybe vent dryer into the space to trap btu's otherwise wasted and put into hot water???? Need a way to give it heat. I guess if it's in furnace room with uninsulated ductwork???? I'n not to sure but we'll see.
    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,800
    Yeah, my biggest concern would be the extra cold in an already cooler area of the house. I hadn't even considered the extra heat needed in the winter. I suppose you could make a discharge duct that had a diverting damper to dump the cold air outside in the winter and into the ductwork in the summer. I wonder if that would be worth the effort?
    A Veteran is a person, who at some point in their life, wrote a blank check payable to the United States of America for payment up to and including their life.
    Gene Castagnetti-Director of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,064
    I don't believe it exhaust the air to the outside. More like right back into the same space the air came from.

    Other wise. You would have to supply it with a lot of fresh outside air.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas via Chicago Area via Straight Up from There on Lake Superior
    Posts
    1,411
    GE is supposed to release a Hybrid HWH in late 2009. Did Rheem beat them to the market?

    Does the Rheem require 220V like the GE? Since I have only 110 the cost of a hybrid would be BIG. Also, using NG now.

    I would put a hybrid in our garage and would hope for a reduction in the humidity there. I thought it might be ideal because the lowest temp there in the high 60's and mid 70's in the summer. Sound about right?

    I assume that the Rheem is highly insulated, correct?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,673
    The heat from the ambient air is pumped into the water, making the ambient air colder.
    Except for the hot water that goes down the drain the heat from the water also goes into the air.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Baltimore MD and Ridgebury PA
    Posts
    542
    Quote Originally Posted by jerryd_2008 View Post
    GE is supposed to release a Hybrid HWH in late 2009. Did Rheem beat them to the market?

    Does the Rheem require 220V like the GE? Since I have only 110 the cost of a hybrid would be BIG. Also, using NG now.

    I would put a hybrid in our garage and would hope for a reduction in the humidity there. I thought it might be ideal because the lowest temp there in the high 60's and mid 70's in the summer. Sound about right?

    I assume that the Rheem is highly insulated, correct?
    I would presume that the Rheem product operates on 220v like a typical electric water heater... especially considering the fact that it includes electric heating elements in case it needs to supplement the heat pump portion of it. That being said, what do you mean you only have 110v? Do you mean to say your house does not have any 220v service coming to it (I have seen this around here) or that the outlet located by the water heater is 110v? If there is a dedicated 110v outlet near the existing water heater then it would not be that difficult to switch it from 110v to 220v but that assumes the existing outlet wiring is properly sized for the load.

    Depending on your rates for NG and electricity it is quite possible that the Natural Gas Water Heater could still be cheaper than the Heat Pump Water Heater. I know around here natural gas is comparatively cheaper than electricity. Of course, if it's also serving the function of a dehumidifier for you then maybe it would be worth it.

    Regardless, I would probably go with a gas tankless water heater before I would go with a heat pump water heater. Unfortunately, I don't have Natural Gas available at my home so I am considering the Rheem product if they ever actually make it to market. I have heard we are having the same problem in the Baltimore market... they don't have them yet.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas via Chicago Area via Straight Up from There on Lake Superior
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by platchford View Post
    ... what do you mean you only have 110v? Do you mean to say your house does not have any 220v service coming to it (I have seen this around here) or that the outlet located by the water heater is 110v? If there is a dedicated 110v outlet near the existing water heater then it would not be that difficult to switch it from 110v to 220v but that assumes the existing outlet wiring is properly sized for the load.
    House has 220 but not at HW heater. Didn't know you could use existing 110 and upgrade. I was assuming that my "ballpark" costs would be $$$ to run a circuit.

    Quote Originally Posted by platchford View Post
    Depending on your rates for NG and electricity it is quite possible that the Natural Gas Water Heater could still be cheaper than the Heat Pump Water Heater. I know around here natural gas is comparatively cheaper than electricity. Of course, if it's also serving the function of a dehumidifier for you then maybe it would be worth it.
    Use NG for other appliances and furnace. The dehumidifier capability seems nice but probably much cheaper to install a good portable. But , Darn, no drains in the garage. Don't relish emptying the DH daily.

    Quote Originally Posted by platchford View Post
    Regardless, I would probably go with a gas tankless water heater before I would go with a heat pump water heater. Unfortunately, I don't have Natural Gas available at my home so I am considering the Rheem product if they ever actually make it to market. I have heard we are having the same problem in the Baltimore market... they don't have them yet.
    Just remember that tankless NG or electric don't have any reserve so no power then no HW. Had that painfully brought home when we had an ice storm earlier this year that took out power for 3.5 days and worse yet TV for 4.5 days. Lots of nice hot water and stove to cook on though. Also pushed us over the edge on modifying the wood burning fireplace with a NG insert to insure some better heat.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Grottoes VA
    Posts
    5,856
    Yes air is just dumped back into the room the water heater is located in. It requires a 220V 30 amp circuit that a typical electric water heater uses. The tank is a standard electric water heater with the heat pump mounted on top, if the tank leaks you can swap out the tank and reuse the heat pump.
    Karst means cave. So, I search for caves.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1
    So, I live in San Jose, CA and my water heater is in the garage. On a typical summer day if it's 85 degrees outside it's 105 degrees in the garage and it never cools off. In the winter, the coldest night is 36 degrees but the day temperature is typically in the 50's.
    Would a heat-pump style water heater make sense in a climate/environment like this?

    My current water heater is gas, but I have Photovoltaic solar panels on my roof and my cumulative annual electric bill hovers around $0. If I switched from gas to electric hot water, I'm curious what the incremental usage of electricity would be. My gas bill is $35/mo in the summer and $100-$120/mo in the winter, but I have gas heat and a gas cooktop as well

    Any way to vent the cool air into my house during the summer? :-)
    Thanks in advance to anyone who replies.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,064
    Nope. Can't have vents from garage to house.
    How much electric, depends on hot water demand. Could be anywhere from 200 to 400KWHs a month(or more or less), depending on garage temps, and water demand.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    40
    I have a skewed view since I live in south florida where my AC runs almost constantly.

    I think the heat pump water heater is a fantastic idea - I have a window shaker in my garage which is the best $130 I've ever spent - if these had been widespread 3 years ago I probably would have moved my HW heater into there instead.

    I'm actually surprised that nobody makes central air systems that have water heaters incorporated into them... I'm pretty sure my HVAC system could generate all the hot water I'd ever want, and probably heat a swimming pool or two as well - for "free".

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,064
    Most geo systems have it.

    And some standard air to air systems do also.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event