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Thread: Rotating tires

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump_rrr View Post
    The proper rotation pattern for a rear wheel drive truck using 4 identical tires is the rearward cross pattern.
    This helps round out any cupping or uneven wear usually associated with vans and trucks which usually are well loaded with a rear weight bias.
    Right Rear tire moves to the Right Front position.
    Left Rear tire moves to the Left Front position.
    Left Front tire moves to the Right Rear position.
    Right Front tire moves to the Left Rear position.

    Another solution to prevent uneven wear to the front tires is to buy tires with a continuous rib rather than individual tread blocks.
    These should not be used where snow may be encountered.


    Keeping correct tire pressure will also go a long way towards prolonging the life of your tires.
    The correct pressure is found on the label usually inside one of the door edges or glove box.
    Use this as a starting point and check tires frquently for uneven wear. If the tires are wearing more near the center of the tread you are overinflated while if they are wearing out more along the inside and outside edges the tires are underinflated.
    I have heard an entirely different convention. Here is how it was explained to me.

    When we used bias-belt tires, we used to cross them. They were not very sensitive to changes in direction of rotation.

    When we moved to radial tires, I stopped seeing anyone crossing tires. The thinking was that radials develop a physical familiarity with the direction of rotation, even if they are not the high-end tires that are built to only be used in one direction.

    Perhaps it is for this reason, everywhere I went I saw only examples of front-to-back rotation of tires.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ammoniadog View Post
    I agree getting stuck sucks, but usually you can find people to help push you out of the parking lot or whatever when it happens. It is better than sliding into someone at a stop sign because you can't stop in time.

    Also, I like when I can punch the gas at just the right time on an icy road and spin around a corner (or into a tight parking space on the street) really quickly.
    This sounds like you had already made up your mind before you asked the question originaly.
    Those who dance, appear insane to those who do not hear the music.
    Those who believe, appear ignorant to those who do not know God.

  3. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    I have heard an entirely different convention. Here is how it was explained to me.

    When we used bias-belt tires, we used to cross them. They were not very sensitive to changes in direction of rotation.

    When we moved to radial tires, I stopped seeing anyone crossing tires. The thinking was that radials develop a physical familiarity with the direction of rotation, even if they are not the high-end tires that are built to only be used in one direction.

    Perhaps it is for this reason, everywhere I went I saw only examples of front-to-back rotation of tires.
    The method I described is what is recommended in the manual of my 2008 Ford F-250.
    It is also the method recommended by the Tire and Rim association along with the alternative-X pattern where all 4 tires are crossed for rear wheel drive vehicles with non directional tires.
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=43

  4. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by thump_rrr View Post
    The method I described is what is recommended in the manual of my 2008 Ford F-250.
    It is also the method recommended by the Tire and Rim association along with the alternative-X pattern where all 4 tires are crossed for rear wheel drive vehicles with non directional tires.
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=43
    I have no doubt that there are official sources that show crossing the tires. I once managed a large Ford fleet (150+) and we never crossed for rotation. It was not something I instituted, either. Frankly, I see a lot of difference between the approach that dealers take to things and what happens out in the field.

    The goal of crossing is to extend tire life due to wear patterns, instead of fixing what is causing the wear pattern. Fixing wear patterns is expensive on vans, as it often means installing aftermarket adjusting kits to allow for a true alignment of the tire geometry. Ford will not pay a dealer to add these kits, so they say dealers should rotate the tires. It's the cheapest way out for them when they design a front end that only has a toe-in adjustment.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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