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Thread: $$$ advice

  1. #1
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    Oct 2008
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    Georgia
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    $$$ advice

    This is a question for any people who have been in the following siutation or can offer some serious advice.

    I am married with a 17 month old daughter and a house. Wife works part time and I right now am making about $18/hr in the flooring industry. We have a comfortable living, not beyond our means but also not with thousands of dollars left at the end of the month.

    I know coming into the HVAC industry, after school, that it is reasonable to guess around $12-$13 starting out which will be a decent downgrade in pay from where we are now. I know it will all be worth it in the end as this will be a career and right now flooring is just a job.

    So my question is this, does anyone have advice where to cut corners or how to better budget when taking a pay cut or has anyone gotten into HVAC and taken a pay cut and how did it work out. I am sure it won't be a big deal and with some extra caution and responsability we will be fine.....but any advice is appriciated.

    thanks.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2009
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    south KC, MO
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    I have been in school for almost a year. My wife works and I remodel on the side. We took a pay cut simalar to what you are experiencing. I can say it's not easy but just make a budget and stick with it. Keep telling yourself that it will all be worth it soon, stay positive, and it will all work out.


    Good Luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Charm City--the city that bleeds
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    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by adamste81 View Post
    This is a question for any people who have been in the following siutation or can offer some serious advice.

    I am married with a 17 month old daughter and a house. Wife works part time and I right now am making about $18/hr in the flooring industry. We have a comfortable living, not beyond our means but also not with thousands of dollars left at the end of the month.

    I know coming into the HVAC industry, after school, that it is reasonable to guess around $12-$13 starting out which will be a decent downgrade in pay from where we are now. I know it will all be worth it in the end as this will be a career and right now flooring is just a job.

    So my question is this, does anyone have advice where to cut corners or how to better budget when taking a pay cut or has anyone gotten into HVAC and taken a pay cut and how did it work out. I am sure it won't be a big deal and with some extra caution and responsability we will be fine.....but any advice is appriciated.

    thanks.
    drop geico, or don't go there if you're not there already. Just dropping them saved us 400 a year.
    It's great to be alive and pumping oxygen!

  4. #4
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    May 2001
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    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
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    13,864
    Geezed I feel blessed when I read something like this post.

    I've been in HVAC since I was 19 yo. Crazy how my life has been. The trade has always been good to me. Raised 4 kids got them through college. When back to college myself and got my degree. Now I'm 65 all of a sudden.

    All I can tell you is to keep focused on the school you are going to. The school should have a 'placement program' which will help you land a job. A employer like myself would look favoriably on a family man when hiring. With your life experience and your schooling you might be surprised if your entry level pay if a bit higher than you think. Good luck.

  5. #5
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by benncool View Post
    Geezed I feel blessed when I read something like this post..
    Yeah I have been in flooring for 7 years with same company. It is time to make a change and a career in mechanic services is something i cannot wait to begin.

    Quote Originally Posted by benncool View Post
    A employer like myself would look favoriably on a family man when hiring. With your life experience and your schooling you might be surprised if your entry level pay if a bit higher than you think. Good luck.
    Thanks, I also hope that my work history (7 yrs at this job, 4 at job before that) will show stability along with the baby, marriage and house. Not that I want a leg up on a 20 year old single guy but until an employer sees your work all he has to go on is your background and personality.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
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    7,415
    Just a random thought that's easier to say than do...

    Pretend you make that $13/hr right now, budget for that, stick the extra $5/hr in a savings account and kind of pretend it's not there.

    Doing that for even a few months before you take the plunge will give you a little something extra laying around for the "what if's" later.

    I'd also say, this trade while not always easy on your body is likely much easier on your body than flooring. Many years down the road you'll likely be glad you switched.
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Rochelle Il / Chicago
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    169
    oh boy........

    I've seen many people take the ride. Some get off at the next corner and others tough it out.

    I? after a divorce, re marriage and going from 2 kids to 3 then to 5 I almost got off at the next corner. But I love what I do. 20 years in the field and 10 with the same co. and I'm field supervisor and my wife doesn't have to work.

    Every one here has fought slow times and hard times. You? give it a go, but be honest with yourself. In one year, look hard at where you are and how far you have come, and if you're not happy and have not met your goals then get off.

    In short, just keep it real.

  8. #8
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    Mar 2004
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    Illinois
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    6,959
    Guaranteed diet plan: Eat less and exercise more.

    Guaranteed financial plan: Spend less and work more.

    Forget all the other bs, magic pills don't work and neither does magical financial solutions.

    Bottom line is you suffer now for great rewards in the future, never stop educating yourself and making yourself more valuable to employers.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2007
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    I am unsure myself
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    1,116
    When I started I was in the same boat I was making great money but it was a plant with no transferrable skills a young family etc. In a few years after the change I had matched my income and after I got my journeyman status I never looked back. I have three kids now 8 mths 4 yrs and 9yrs my wife hasn't worked in 7 years and we live a very comfortable life with a nice home and no worries plus I love what I do and when a hospital or other important site calls me to solve their problems it makes me proud to do what I do. I am ten years into this business and the only thing I can say is I love it and the ones who are really good treat this not as a job but as a lifestyle JMHO

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Pluto
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    God, I can remember when I got into the trade I was getting $6.00 an hour, and that was with no experience at all. And that was better pay than what I was making prior to this as I was in the Marine Corps. Now, 23 years later, I'm one of the highest paid service guys at the place I work. There are times I hate my job, but I wouldn't trade it for anything. Always something new shows up.

    I hope you can make it financially if you decide to move over to the trade. It can get to be a bear at times, but it is worth it.
    Not as lean, not as mean, but I'm still a hardcore, ass-kicking, hard charging Marine! Oohrah!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
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    12,077
    It's difficult to explain from the perspective of most of us who have done this as their only job. I can vaguely remember the money I made back then. I didn't even really concentrate on it. I blew money on beer and beer. And that was it. Food was second. And just worked and worked.

    All I knew, and know is the better I got, the more I knew, the more I could do, the more experience, knowledge and ENTHUSIASM, I had customers who clamored for me, which meant more and more money. This trade has a high ceiling that way.

    You might start low, but it ultimately is up to you how quickly you can move up the food chain.

    I will tell you something here very controversial that many owners here will not like. Your gonna have to change jobs a few times to move up that pay scale.

  12. #12
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    Oct 2008
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    Georgia
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    Thanks to all of you for the advice, everything you all have said makes sense. And it does seem that this becomes more than a job and more like a lifestyle. Looking forward to many profitable years in the business, it may just be me but I think positive thinking and a positive attitude go a far way. It may not bring in more money but the more you stay positive about what's to come in the future, the less you focus on the harder times as a newbie.

  13. #13
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    Nov 2003
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    Montreal, Qc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dowadudda View Post
    I will tell you something here very controversial that many owners here will not like. Your gonna have to change jobs a few times to move up that pay scale.
    That is true for the most part but there are some owners who want to see their employees prosper along with the company.

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