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Thread: Chiller Brands

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rockhill South Carolina
    Posts
    370
    blah blah blah dont bash the brands you dont know how to fix,there are some complicated machines out that work well if you understand anything besides stack heavy parts off stack heavy parts back on,and who the hell wants to do all those oilchanges low pressure is a dying breed so get over it.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    45th Parallel
    Posts
    954
    Nah, changed my mind. Not gonna bite. Bed time and I think the Mrs.
    misses me.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    27
    Hey guys, asked this a few weeks back but didn't get any responses - anyone work on Dimplex brand chillers? I have a tactical electronic system which uses a 20-ton Dimplex, it appears to be a commercial off the shelf technical chiller painted tan for military application. The Navy guys supporting the system are turning it over to the Army (me) soon. Currently I have no chillers in inventory I work on, only package units, so not really up on chiller stuff. I'm supposed to get vendor training on this thing hopefully early next year. Until then I'm on my own. Anything I should know about these things?

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by NWMech View Post
    I'd really like to see that article if you don't mind sending it.
    On it's way, bro.
    Low Pressure Forever!

    If you know heavy metal, you can work anywhere-Dave Andreson

    Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh!
    Farewell to foreign shores, We sail at break of day. Through our last night on shore, Drink to the foam. Until we meet once more. Here's wishing you a happy voyage home!

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by edward j View Post
    Are you for real or what if you understand the realty you would know that the the is that for ever conversion the reality was R 12 AND R11 being released to atmosphere. This is why every manufacturer pushed for containment
    If you do your research you will understand the associated costs of gettinmg rid of these refrigerants.
    Trane of course made the right discission R 123 IS the most efficient refrigerant, odp, gwp and atmospheric life is way below R 134a
    Good example of why the chiller forum should be in the pro section.

    A properly done conversion releases less refrigerant into the atmosphere than routine maintenance on an RTU. The reclaimed R-11 will eventually have to be disposed of, but in the meantime there are still a lot of chillers that will be using it for a while to come. Sure, Trane would love to sell a lot more Centravacs, but conversion is a viable and cost effective alternative in many applications. At least we agree that Trane made the right decision by sticking with 123.
    Low Pressure Forever!

    If you know heavy metal, you can work anywhere-Dave Andreson

    Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh!
    Farewell to foreign shores, We sail at break of day. Through our last night on shore, Drink to the foam. Until we meet once more. Here's wishing you a happy voyage home!

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by captinsano View Post
    and who the hell wants to do all those oilchanges low pressure is a dying breed so get over it.
    Oil changes? What oil changes? On a low speed direct drive centrifugal you only need to change the oil when an oil analysis indicates it. I've taken care of machines that still had the same oil charge since commissioning. Some in the 8 to 10 year range. Just change the filter and oil analysis and you're good to go.

    Why do you think low pressure machines are a dying breed? I don't think so at all. With the phaseout of 123 still 20 years away, there's still a lot of life in low pressure, my friend. LaCrosse is cranking them out as fast as they can produce them for the world market.
    Low Pressure Forever!

    If you know heavy metal, you can work anywhere-Dave Andreson

    Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh!
    Farewell to foreign shores, We sail at break of day. Through our last night on shore, Drink to the foam. Until we meet once more. Here's wishing you a happy voyage home!

  7. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by edward j View Post
    Are you for real or what if you understand the realty you would know that the the is that for ever conversion the reality was R 12 AND R11 being released to atmosphere. This is why every manufacturer pushed for containment
    If you do your research you will understand the associated costs of gettinmg rid of these refrigerants.
    Trane of course made the right discission R 123 IS the most efficient refrigerant, odp, gwp and atmospheric life is way below R 134a
    I would like to know why you made the above comment?

    I would like to clarify, R 123 is the most efficient and has the lowest GWP.
    It also has the highest ODP.

    You are correct, it's atmospheric life is shorter than 134a.

    Unfortunately, R 123 degrades the ozone while in the atmosphere. R 134a does nothing when released.

    The ODP of R 134a is worse then R 123, but the effects of the ODP occur during the production of R 134a, not the release into atmosphere.

    Regards,

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Cape Cod
    Posts
    157
    Trane!!

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Rockhill South Carolina
    Posts
    370
    trane weeeeeeeeeek!HP all the way

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Winnipeg,MB,Canada
    Posts
    93

    Thumbs up R-123 article

    Hey, chillerwhisperer, I'd sure like to read that article.
    Low pressure forever!
    Trane, all the way!

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by chiller-thriller View Post
    Hey, chillerwhisperer, I'd sure like to read that article.
    Low pressure forever!
    Trane, all the way!
    Just sent it to you.
    Low Pressure Forever!

    If you know heavy metal, you can work anywhere-Dave Andreson

    Anchors Aweigh my boys, Anchors Aweigh!
    Farewell to foreign shores, We sail at break of day. Through our last night on shore, Drink to the foam. Until we meet once more. Here's wishing you a happy voyage home!

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    60
    Heck I still service a ton of Carrier r-11 machines.I dont need a resperator when i recover it either. I have worked on Trane, Carrier and york lp machines and i like the Carrier myself.We have very few problems with them and there is still a ton of them out in the field.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,610

    A difference of opinion

    Quote Originally Posted by ChillerWisperer View Post
    Oil changes? What oil changes? On a low speed direct drive centrifugal you only need to change the oil when an oil analysis indicates it. I've taken care of machines that still had the same oil charge since commissioning. Some in the 8 to 10 year range. Just change the filter and oil analysis and you're good to go......
    There are pros and cons to both high and low pressure centrifugals. I personally like both. This particular topic concerning low pressure and lack of all need for oil changes has been a bone of contention for quite some time, however, so I think that I'll briefly hijack this thread and voice an opinion.

    Do I believe that oil needs to be changed every year in LP's? No. But I have seen oil drawn for analysis that you couldn't see through in a glass container, when it started out light honey gold to clear, and the report came back that the oil was fine - keep on runnin' the thing. I've seen it on York's, Trane's, Carrier's, etc.

    No matter how tight a machine is kept, there will be air - and therefore moisture - ingress into the machine, if from nothing else, changing the oil filter. This, coupled with the natural breakdown of mineral oil from heat, doesn't make for a long life for the oil lubricated parts and pieces of the machine. I use analysis, coupled with visual inspection, machine history, and sometimes I even throw experience and plain old gut feeling in there - but NOBODY will ever succeed in convincing me that you can run the same oil in ANY machine for 8 + years and it's still going to be as good as new.

    Synthetic oil in HP machines will definitely go a little longer, but contrary to what popular opinion is by one particular manufacturer, nothing lasts forever. I've always wondered how many machines die a premature death due to this practice. I personally know of chillers that have the same oil in them 15 years after commissioning (other than what was added to make up for filter change and sample losses). The stuff looked like molasses in the sample bottle. I'm sorry, folks, I just don't buy it..................
    Last edited by klove; 09-12-2009 at 11:33 PM.

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