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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Calif.
    Posts
    110

    Talking How long to replace evaporator coil in split system?

    Iíve been tasked with a job of replacing a evaporator coil on a small split system at a site thatís a 6 hour round trip drive, which only gives me 2 hours and there is no overtime allowed. I was wondering what the average time would be to accomplish this.

    I already know that Iím going to have to make a couple of trips and I definitely need to pressure check this overnight. The system was already evacuated and a new condenser was installed 3 years ago, but never started up because a problem was found in the evaporator during the vacuum test. The condenser was never opened up and it still has the original charge. Iím hoping that I donít have to replace the lines due to the time constraints and Iím concerned about the lines being rotten.

    My plan is to change out the evaporator coil and pressure check it over night with nitrogen, which Iím pretty sure I can do this in less than 2 hours. And by leaving all my tools on site I donít have to clean up.

    I'm hoping to finish the next day if all goes well. I donít know what it is, but it always seems to take a lot more time for the little stuff like vacuum testing, charging and final operation checks. There always is something left to do. Oh and then thereís the clean up. I liked it when I had an apprentice to pick up all my stuff as I was working.

    Anyway this going to be the longest time I've ever spent on installing an evaporator.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Olean, NY
    Posts
    1,445
    6 on the road and no ot? there are no local companies? why wouldnt they just pay the ot and save the follow up trip? I'd just finish and take the next day off...

    I mean the vac pump will take half that time. setting up will take the other half..
    Guinness for strength

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    West Central Florida
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by B_roche View Post
    6 on the road and no ot? there are no local companies? why wouldnt they just pay the ot and save the follow up trip? I'd just finish and take the next day off...

    I mean the vac pump will take half that time. setting up will take the other half..
    I agree. Why can't your company sub this out to someone local? Or just say NO to the whole thing. 3 hours away is ridiculous.
    "Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it." Henry Ford

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    West Central Florida
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyB60 View Post
    And by leaving all my tools on site I donít have to clean up.
    Even if your not being paid for it. Take the time to take your tools with you. I would imagine you had to buy them so don't let your companies lack of planning hurry you into bad judgment. Just my thoughts.
    "Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it." Henry Ford

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Calif.
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by B_roche View Post
    6 on the road and no ot? there are no local companies? why wouldnt they just pay the ot and save the follow up trip? I'd just finish and take the next day off...

    I mean the vac pump will take half that time. setting up will take the other half..
    There has been a lot of that going on and I admit I’ve done it in the past, but it shouldn’t be that way. We are paid for a regular shift and should be paid OT if going outside our shift. I would rather have the money than time off. 10 or even 5 years ago this would never have happened, but as more and more people do it, then the more it is expected. I don’t think it’s right and California does have laws for this sort of thing.

    Besides, I plug in some CDs and get paid for listening to my music so I’m happy with it. I think the OT would be cheaper in the long run, but I’m not the one making the decisions.

    There is another tech for that area, but that’s another story, besides he may be reading this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Calif.
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by dracorp2 View Post
    Even if your not being paid for it. Take the time to take your tools with you. I would imagine you had to buy them so don't let your companies lack of planning hurry you into bad judgment. Just my thoughts.
    Actually my tools are safer left at the site then in my truck. Itís a very remote site with 8Ē filled concrete walls and a steel door. It also has 6í high fence with barbed razor wire and cameras.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Manly, Iowa
    Posts
    118

    I'M Confused but hats not hard to do!

    You say you had an apprentice to pick up your tools before and you miss it. Implies to me that you have been doing tech work for awhile yet you ask how long it takes to replace a coil. Nope! If you are an experienced tech that has had a helper you would know that on a system that has been sitting idle without refrigerant and your going to replace the evap that had problems you would :

    a. Remove the old evap
    b. sweep the ref lines and I would pressure test the line at that time since ref hasn't been released form cond.
    c. Install evap and pressure test.
    d. Triple evac--time to do this will vary on type equipment you have 3cfm-6cfm pump etc.

    Well if your an experienced tech you know what comes next- or do you? Not slamming ya bud-just pointing out the obvious--if ya don't know -say I don't know! Say I am new and need help here-Everyone here will help ya out-but if you come here posing makes us think your full of---- and most will review but not help!
    Learn the process not the procedure--the process will dictate the procedure-If ya understand how it works ya knows how to fix it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Calif.
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by old_fart View Post
    Well if your an experienced tech you know what comes next- or do you? Not slamming ya bud-just pointing out the obvious--if ya don't know -say I don't know! Say I am new and need help here-Everyone here will help ya out-but if you come here posing makes us think your full of---- and most will review but not help!
    Oh, I thought this was the General Discussion forum. I guess you didnít get the point. The point is not a step by step question on how to do it. I thought that was for another forum.
    Iím not asking for advice, I already know how to do my job. Maybe, it will be clearer if you have another beer or whatever your drinking.

  9. #9
    sometimes i feel like were not all on the same team here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,403
    How long it "should" take, and how long things generally take me are 2 entirely different things.

    If I were going to go do that job I'd guess 2 hours would be about right for the swap and psi check. Of course the 2nd trip and evac would probably 4 hours.
    Butttt. if I had to go do this, I'm sure the flue would be in the way, or some other simple obstruction that would really kick my butt and make the easy job hard
    "If you call that hard work, a koalaís life would look heroic."

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    Testo... you guys rule!

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