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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Waffleville
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    10,339
    Quote Originally Posted by 2001 View Post
    I believe Andy is right
    ROTFLMAO!!!!

    you believe he is right???

    LMAO
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1...eature=related

    Before we work on artificial intelligence why don't we do something about natural stupidity?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
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    2,987
    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckHVAC View Post
    Andy, are you saying that all Sporlan TXVs are still made in the USA? I'm not trying to be a smart ass, I really want to know. I try to buy anything U.S. made that I can.
    All Sporlan products are currently manufactured in Washington, MO with the exception of our CDS electric epr valves made specifically for Carrier Transicold (they are made in Singapore for Transicold's Singapore manufactring plant), the ESX electric expansion valve (Parker Korea), and some silly stuff like ball valves, accumulators, and receivers that we picked up due to our Parker acquisition.
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. Abraham Maslow

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    I was hoping they were being made in China. I just got done changing a 5 ton valve out for the second time. What I really don't like is not knowing how many valves I now have in parts stock that are no better than the ones that fail. Working a week before failing really makes it nice

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    Quote Originally Posted by trane View Post
    I was hoping they were being made in China. I just got done changing a 5 ton valve out for the second time. What I really don't like is not knowing how many valves I now have in parts stock that are no better than the ones that fail. Working a week before failing really makes it nice
    And what was the likely cause of failure of the TEV, for the second time? It's quite easy to identify most failures that are truly TEV failures in the field. Most system problems that are attributed to TEV failures are not TEV failures.
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. Abraham Maslow

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
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    2,868
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Schoen View Post
    And what was the likely cause of failure of the TEV, for the second time? It's quite easy to identify most failures that are truly TEV failures in the field. Most system problems that are attributed to TEV failures are not TEV failures.
    Another bad TEV that was in stock and failed for the same reason as the first. I am sure you are aware of the problem.


    After recently identifying and correcting several TEV failure modes, testing has revealed
    a new failure mode in certain R-22 Indoor Thermal Expansion Valves (TEVs),
    built by Sporlan. The supplier of the ballast material allowed moisture to be introduced
    into the sensor bulb circuit portion of the power element of the valves. Testing of the
    affected valves revealed that over time, reaction to this moisture reduces the response to
    temperature changes. Although failed valves may exhibit effects on system performance
    similar to previously identified failure modes, the root cause is not related. This bulletin
    will affect only R-22 Sporlan indoor TEVs that fail to maintain correct superheat control.
    The action described in this bulletin is not being taken to address a safety concern.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,987
    Quote Originally Posted by trane View Post
    Another bad TEV that was in stock and failed for the same reason as the first. I am sure you are aware of the problem.


    After recently identifying and correcting several TEV failure modes, testing has revealed
    a new failure mode in certain R-22 Indoor Thermal Expansion Valves (TEVs),
    built by Sporlan. The supplier of the ballast material allowed moisture to be introduced
    into the sensor bulb circuit portion of the power element of the valves. Testing of the
    affected valves revealed that over time, reaction to this moisture reduces the response to
    temperature changes. Although failed valves may exhibit effects on system performance
    similar to previously identified failure modes, the root cause is not related. This bulletin
    will affect only R-22 Sporlan indoor TEVs that fail to maintain correct superheat control.
    The action described in this bulletin is not being taken to address a safety concern.
    It is good that you had a basis to make your claim.

    The date codes of these valves were established and communicated a long ago. Why you would have any of these valves in stock now is perplexing. The problem has been corrected quite some time ago.

    The new ballast material was a Sporlan innovation, and made in America.
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. Abraham Maslow

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    What is even more perplexing is my DSO saying they may still have some in stock. I don't replace many so I don't know how long I have had it. All the problems we have had were on units installed last fall which worked on start up. This spring I started getting calls and find out there is the bulletin out dated January 15 that provided the information above.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by trane View Post
    What is even more perplexing is my DSO saying they may still have some in stock. I don't replace many so I don't know how long I have had it. All the problems we have had were on units installed last fall which worked on start up. This spring I started getting calls and find out there is the bulletin out dated January 15 that provided the information above.
    When you get a new valve, check the end of the sensing bulb opposite the tubing.
    The "new" valves have an indent in the end of the sensing bulb, the old valves have a flat end.

    I'm getting pretty sick of TXV's that fail in under 2 years, or are just plain DOA.

    Sporlan valves are not the only ones, I had a Parker brand R-22 valve DoA a couple of weeks ago when I put in a new Goodman coil for someone.

    Wherever they are made, we have somehow gone from it being one of the more reliable parts in a system to wondering if the valve was going to work in brand new equipment, or if the replacement valve will be any good.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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