Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Bemidji, Mn
    Posts
    3,573

    desuperheater fitting for water heater tanks

    Where is the heck can I find these, they screw right in where the drain for the water heater is, has a chunk of 1/2 copper that goes inside the 3/4, then has an inlet/outlet and drain. Some of you may know what Im talking about. For Geo systems...

    Local parts guys have no idea what Im talking about. Also, these things plug up pretty quick dont they...
    You picked a fine time to leave me loose wheel...

    http://rapalaguy.spaces.live.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    92
    They plug up REAL quick. Every time. Stopped using them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Bemidji, Mn
    Posts
    3,573
    Thats what I was thinking, the water has very little clearance. I "made" one since I wasnt able to find one, it works!
    You picked a fine time to leave me loose wheel...

    http://rapalaguy.spaces.live.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    40
    You are referring to what's known as a "coaxial fitting". As hvacguy said, if you have very hard water in your area they will get clogged up easily.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    New Haven,MO
    Posts
    34
    Have to agree the coaxial method just leeds to maintenance problems if the water has any impurities. We quit piping that way a few years ago. Our manufacturer still shows piping it coaxial in there literature.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    40
    The best thing to do is buy a larger solar tank. Look for tanks designed for open loop solar applications. They will have 5 ports on the top and 3 dip tubes. You usually get more mileage out of a bigger tank when hooked up to a desuperheater because you can store the heat longer and not depend on the electric resistance elements in the heater so much. Disconnect the lower element to so that it's not firing when the desuperheater is working.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    66
    Talk to the parts supply house about a water cooled condenser. It will hold up well with lime build up for a few years.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    40
    The main issue with them liming up is that when they draw water through a coaxial fitting at the bottom of the tank they picku sediment in the bottom of the tank. This sediment then clogs the desuperheaters smaller water passages. This is not an issue when hooked up to a tank with 2 extra dip tubes that are cut 6" from the tank bottom.

    Its pretty sillly to hook them up to a standard water heater from both an efficiency and reliability point of view.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    18
    we use the t&P port on the top with a 3/4 brass nipple to a brass tee, then pull the drain out ant use a 3/4 brass nipple and tee there too it has never given us problems

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    18
    We no longer use coaxial fittings as well. I'm not sure what water heater you are using or if this will help but here's a photo of the desuperheater piping using a Vaughn.



    Ill also try to drum up some different diagrams that could assist you in a different method of piping without need of a coaxial.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,977
    We always use a 50 gallon desuperheater storage tank before going into the water tank and have had no issues with this so far and from what I can tell is the most efficient. Plus we dont' need to use that silly 4 way fitting that plugs up, we just push the water back in through the drain at the bottom and pull out of the cold water inlet in the top.

    Then again, in Oregon we are required by law to hire a plumber and pull a permit for anything beyond two nipples and two 18" water flex lines so my plumber brings the fittings he needs.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by SkyHeating View Post
    Then again, in Oregon we are required by law to hire a plumber and pull a permit for anything beyond two nipples and two 18" water flex lines so my plumber brings the fittings he needs.
    Same issue with plumbing in Mass, then head over the border to here in NH and were allowed to do the piping ourselves.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    47
    We pull off of the cold water inlet, pipe it to the desuperheater, and then pipe it back to the bottom of the waterheater using a 3/4inch brass T with a boiler drain on the opposite side.

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