What type of refrigerant ??
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    58

    Question What type of refrigerant ??

    I am sure most of you may have come across a situation like this.
    Walk-in cooler at a convenient store. Do not have any data plate, No markings/notations what so ever that tells you what gas is in it. The owner says guy comes every few months and charge it and I pay lot of $$$. What he is putting in it is a mystery. I do not want to rely on pressure readings alone. 240/65. Could be r22? 50 degrees. I know some of you will suggest retro, change over to a clean refrigerant and that is all good.
    My question is, is there any type of analyzer available to determine type of refrigerant in the system? I found some that are only for automotives only. What would you do in a situation like this? Need some tips from refrigerant gurus out there.
    Thanks.
    HS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,314
    Yellow Jacket makes one, I think.

    Also, you could do a test by shutting unit off and allowing it to reach saturation at ambient. Take P/T and prove what gas it is.

    Or what gas it isn't.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,127

    Call the compressor manufacturer

    And ask them what gas is supposed to be used with it.

    Then check the TXV to see what it's for.

    If both agree, then FIX THE LEAKS, and either use that gas, or pull the existing charge and switch to that gas.

    PHM
    --------


    Quote Originally Posted by ndiglo View Post
    I am sure most of you may have come across a situation like this.
    Walk-in cooler at a convenient store. Do not have any data plate, No markings/notations what so ever that tells you what gas is in it. The owner says guy comes every few months and charge it and I pay lot of $$$. What he is putting in it is a mystery. I do not want to rely on pressure readings alone. 240/65. Could be r22? 50 degrees. I know some of you will suggest retro, change over to a clean refrigerant and that is all good.
    My question is, is there any type of analyzer available to determine type of refrigerant in the system? I found some that are only for automotives only. What would you do in a situation like this? Need some tips from refrigerant gurus out there.
    Thanks.
    PHM
    --------
    The conventional view serves to protect us from the painful job of thinking.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Banana Republic,Florida
    Posts
    400
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Yellow Jacket makes one, I think.

    Also, you could do a test by shutting unit off and allowing it to reach saturation at ambient. Take P/T and prove what gas it is.

    Or what gas it isn't.
    Y.J DOES SELL SOMETHING THAT WILL ANALYZE THE GAS BUT ITS VERY $$$$$ ITS NOT A CHEAP TOY OVER $500 PLUS I THINK DONT HAVE THE P/N THOU SORRY
    Mastic its whats for dinner!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    5,991
    Check the X Valve!!! If it is an R-12, dump the the charge and put your own flavor in.
    PUT A TAG ON THE CONDENSING UNIT OR TOP OF COMPRESSOR !!!!!
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    386
    Ask the guy to see the last couple of invoices. should be on there, you would think?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by gatorfan9606 View Post
    Y.J DOES SELL SOMETHING THAT WILL ANALYZE THE GAS BUT ITS VERY $$$$$ ITS NOT A CHEAP TOY OVER $500 PLUS I THINK DONT HAVE THE P/N THOU SORRY
    ya, it detects a whopping 3 different kinds of refrigerant

    someone forgot to tell them about all the other refrigerants



    .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    24
    At static pressure then determine what your ambient saturated pressure boiling point using a P/t chart. Using this method always work for me.

    IceMonster

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    392
    Quote Originally Posted by IceMonster View Post
    At static pressure then determine what your ambient saturated pressure boiling point using a P/t chart. Using this method always work for me.

    IceMonster
    I think this method only tells you what the last Tech put in the system ? Couple questions ? What if he put wrong gas in system and now is a blend ? What if gas he put in not compatible with oil in system ?
    I would try to cross reference compressor # ( if readable ) and any info if unit has a TXV. Then dump gas in system and recharge with what I hope is correct gas and use amp readings on compressor along with pressures. And of course the leak was located and repaired first.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    497
    Quote Originally Posted by rayr View Post
    Check the X Valve!!! If it is an R-12, dump the the charge and put your own flavor in.
    PUT A TAG ON THE CONDENSING UNIT OR TOP OF COMPRESSOR !!!!!
    We tag all our condensing units... It makes me mad when someone removes our tags

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    In the Hudson Valley of New York
    Posts
    1,809
    I went to a job at a food processing plant, where the hack put R-22 in every thing, R-502 units, R-404 Units, R-12 units, etc. Guess that was the cheapest gas at the time? The hack did not even bother to change the TXVs to match, Needless to say the R-12 units were going off on OL. We made alot of money straightening that mess out. Another guy that wanted to save money LOL! I usually check the data plate if it has one, cross reference compressor model number with wholesaler, check txv data, check the pressure control settings.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    58
    Thanks to all of you. Lot of good info.
    Sorry I could not get back soon. Someone mentioned there is an analyzer wich can detect whopping three gases and sure there is none that I could find for tons of other refrigerants out there. Any way, Found the leak and it was at service valve on reciever. (Stem corroded) Must replace. (Or charge every few weeks and make $$$) Not to mention, I had to remove all the refrigerant. While I had it in the tank, took the good old PT readings and sure enough it is R22. While working on the unit noticed a white sticker at the base of the unit, almost faded away. It was getting dark. I could barely see under flash light "R22". Why not make it a little bit smaller !
    So... Thanks everyone. As always, learned a few more things.
    HS

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Posts
    858
    I was going to suggest having them run the security tapes to see what he was carrying in.

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