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  1. #1

    Need ducts in every room?

    AC was added to an old house - unit in the attic - vents on second floor ceilings in 3 bedrooms and bath - on first floor the vents were placed in the ceiling of the den but three other first floor rooms (kitchen, dining and living rooms) do not have vents nor are there any doors so air flows. Since cold air drops down the stairs from the second floor and mixes with cold air from the den the unvented rooms in between get cool. Essentially, the central air system does cool all of the cubic feet of the house even though the 3 rooms never got vents. Is the house still considered central air if I sell?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    48
    Technically with it being within the same envelope yes. But the main problem is there could be humidity issues due to lack of airflow in those rooms. These issues will or should be noticed by any competent home inspector and pointed out to the potential buyers!
    <*}(((-< Good work is not cheap!
    >*}(((-< Cheap work is not good!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    Is there a basement that the equipment can be moved to so then supply runs can be added to the other rooms along with the existing rooms to have the entire house H/C instead of just the upstairs ?

  4. #4

    Thanks for prompt reply

    I've lived in the house for more than 6 years with air provided as described and have not had a problem, e.g. humidity. Just wanted a professional opinion about describing the house with "central air conditioning" though the three rooms lack ducts and I agree with the view that the "envelope" is correctly described as cooled by central air.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pamnyra VA.
    Posts
    709
    probably what happened on the install, as the installer couldn't get the supply drop down from the attic thru the second floor to the first floor. i used to drop down in the closets or take a corner of a room and make a chase .some homeowners didn't want a chase in there rooms. sometimes you can split the duct between the floors( it depends which way the floor joists are running)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,571
    As long as the return air travels thru the rooms.
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  7. #7

    Whole House Return

    A large return is in the ceiling on the second floor (with the filter) and pulls the return air (rising warm air) back into the system. Since there are no barriers/doors on the first floor the air is always moving while the system is on. Thanks all

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,425

    "Central air?"

    Yeah, I'd think you'd still be able to list this as a "central air" home, although I'm old enough to remember when "central heat" referred to a pot bellied wood stove smack in the middle of the home! Sounds like it works fine, regardless! If you've lived in it and it works fine, don't sweat the minor stuff!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    Most happy homeowners looking to buy another home do not even bother to look over the HVAC equipment now a days any ways, so chances are no one will look at your equipment either when the time comes to sell.

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