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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Ziocarl View Post
    Yes I don't want to mess with it myself and risk doing any damage, but you've raised a few questions for me:

    How can he rinse the indoor air handler parts he cleans with the triple-D? Where will the run off water go? The inside of that handler, at least before the filter and coils is lined with black fiberglass noise-reduction batting. I would thing I wouldn't want him getting that wet at all.

    What are "cells?"

    What's an "EAC?"

    Should I avoid duct cleaning companies even for duct cleaning?

    This is a heatpump system, so I don't think I need to wait until spring. If anything I'd like to get and dust and mold out of there before I turn on the humidifier. But what exactly are they supposed to do during a "tune-up." I always expect them to do some actual work, but all the places I;ve had come out ever do is check the coolant charge and run the system. No cleaning, lubing, or adjusting going on at all
    I stopped reading replies half way through because you kept getting stupid answers.

    It's not cheap is why they are not included in most service calls and nearly impossible to clean in place.

    Pay someone to remove the coil take it to your front yard and clean it with a cleaner and water.

    That's the only way to truly clean one.

    A qualified technician knows how to remove the coil and clean it. Evacuate and reinstall it.

    It's that simple.
    R-HVAC techs make the world a cool place.


  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Duttydutdut View Post
    I stopped reading replies half way through because you kept getting stupid answers.

    It's not cheap is why they are not included in most service calls and nearly impossible to clean in place.

    Pay someone to remove the coil take it to your front yard and clean it with a cleaner and water.

    That's the only way to truly clean one.

    A qualified technician knows how to remove the coil and clean it. Evacuate and reinstall it.

    It's that simple.
    Thanks for the clear answer.

    Can they remove the coil without evacuating all of the coolant from the entire system and then having to recharge it? How could they possibly just remove the coil without the entire system losing pressure?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by Ziocarl View Post
    Thanks for the clear answer.

    Can they remove the coil without evacuating all of the coolant from the entire system and then having to recharge it? How could they possibly just remove the coil without the entire system losing pressure?
    indeed they can. It's called a pumpdown. When down properly if possible they can save the refrigerant by storing it in the condenser. Resulting in minimal if any refrigerant loss.

    They still need to evacuate the system when putting it back together which as a result adds to the price due to the fact that if they are going to do it properly it takes a little more time.

    All in all knowing these things you can at least make sure your professional knows what he's doing.

    Hope this helps.
    R-HVAC techs make the world a cool place.


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Duttydutdut View Post
    indeed they can. It's called a pumpdown. When down properly if possible they can save the refrigerant by storing it in the condenser. Resulting in minimal if any refrigerant loss.

    They still need to evacuate the system when putting it back together which as a result adds to the price due to the fact that if they are going to do it properly it takes a little more time.

    All in all knowing these things you can at least make sure your professional knows what he's doing.

    Hope this helps.

    Sorry if I'm being dense, but what does it matter if you can temporarily save the refrigerant by storing in the condenser if you still then have to evacuate the entire system when you put everything back together again?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    174
    The refrigerant will be stored into one half of the system while they work on the other half. Before opening up the part of the system that is storing the refrigerant, they will evacuate (remove moisture and non condensibles) out of the half that they worked on. It won't be temporary and you won't remove the refrigerant, they'll only relocate the refrigerant inside the system.

    A technician should know how to do this.
    R-HVAC techs make the world a cool place.


  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    BBJ Power Coil Clean
    A non-caustic, non-corrosive heavy duty coil cleaner that safely cleans and deodorizes evaporator coils, condenser coils, heating coils, window units, air filters, blowers, and other dirty HVAC/R components without damaging metal surfaces

    With all electical equipment removed (blower, cuircut borads, controls) from the furnace we power wash evaporator in place with hot water pressure washer. Sometimes drain pan removed and thoroughly cleaned, inside and out. Usually only 2 screws to remove it.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by smooth_operator View Post
    BBJ Power Coil Clean
    A non-caustic, non-corrosive heavy duty coil cleaner that safely cleans and deodorizes evaporator coils, condenser coils, heating coils, window units, air filters, blowers, and other dirty HVAC/R components without damaging metal surfaces

    With all electical equipment removed (blower, cuircut borads, controls) from the furnace we power wash evaporator in place with hot water pressure washer. Sometimes drain pan removed and thoroughly cleaned, inside and out. Usually only 2 screws to remove it.

    Thanks for the info, but wait...are you saying that you powerwash the indoor coils in place??? How do you not get everthing wet? There's sound absorbing insulation all over the inside of the air handler that can't be removed

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    We cover insulation liner with sheet metal plates. We replace cased coil insulation liner if it has mold on it or if it's in bad shape. You can reline it with heavy duty foil too.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    Yes, we power wash evaporators and heat exchangers in place. Don't fool yourself that you spray that "magic coil cleaner" and rinse it with pint of water and coil will be clean! NO it will remain dirty coil soaked with coil cleaner (hopefully not corrosive one). You have to pressure wash the crap out of it for an hour or so to get it cleaned from both sides (under and above). We usually use 5-20 gal of hot water to rinse 2-4 ton coil. Wet vacuum collects all that water from the drain pan fast. We protect insulation liner with sheet metal. We replace cased coil insulation liner if it has mold on it or if it's in bad shape. This is not a DIY task, you need a professional to do it.
    -How do you not get everything wet?
    You do get everything wet and washed, but not gas burners, electric controls and components.
    I should mention before we do wet cleaning we use dry method and get most of the dirt out of the unit before wet washing. That way it fast and easy. One more time its not DIY.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by smooth_operator View Post
    Yes, we power wash evaporators and heat exchangers in place. Don't fool yourself that you spray that "magic coil cleaner" and rinse it with pint of water and coil will be clean! NO it will remain dirty coil soaked with coil cleaner (hopefully not corrosive one). You have to pressure wash the crap out of it for an hour or so to get it cleaned from both sides (under and above). We usually use 5-20 gal of hot water to rinse 2-4 ton coil. Wet vacuum collects all that water from the drain pan fast. We protect insulation liner with sheet metal. We replace cased coil insulation liner if it has mold on it or if it's in bad shape. This is not a DIY task, you need a professional to do it.
    -How do you not get everything wet?
    You do get everything wet and washed, but not gas burners, electric controls and components.
    I should mention before we do wet cleaning we use dry method and get most of the dirt out of the unit before wet washing. That way it fast and easy. One more time its not DIY.

    Again, I have no plans to do this myself.

    Where are you located? Why can't I ever find guys like you locally?

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    Im in St.Louis, MO.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    That is a 50,000 dollar question. I'm pretty sure there are some HVAC cleaning professionals in your area. I hope...

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