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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    16,173
    Quote Originally Posted by brewchief View Post
    This is exactly how it is where I work

    You're so funny!

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    92
    The company I work for has a repair shop. There are some tools, located on the other side of the room from the work area and they tend to be mostly rejects or mostly metric. The shop torch is so big it turns 3/8 tubing cherry red is a few seconds, vacuum pump oil was not changed in a year, no nitrogen regulator but a nitrogen bottle. To work on something in the shop you unload your tools into the shop.

    So you can guess what is supplied for the field. We share 2 recovery machines between 4 techs. I liked to have a recovery machine on my truck even my own but I don't think they will give me a cut of the recovery charge. I own my own torch, they pay the gas, but I see nothing of the torch charge.

    a scheme a friend of mine wanted else where is a tool account with payroll deduction and employer paying 50% of tools over a period of time. So the longer you are with the company the more the employer has paid you back for the tools you own to make the company money.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Jax Fl.
    Posts
    1,943
    Quote Originally Posted by richvacr View Post
    The company I work for has a repair shop. There are some tools, located on the other side of the room from the work area and they tend to be mostly rejects or mostly metric. The shop torch is so big it turns 3/8 tubing cherry red is a few seconds, vacuum pump oil was not changed in a year, no nitrogen regulator but a nitrogen bottle. To work on something in the shop you unload your tools into the shop.

    So you can guess what is supplied for the field. We share 2 recovery machines between 4 techs. I liked to have a recovery machine on my truck even my own but I don't think they will give me a cut of the recovery charge. I own my own torch, they pay the gas, but I see nothing of the torch charge.

    a scheme a friend of mine wanted else where is a tool account with payroll deduction and employer paying 50% of tools over a period of time. So the longer you are with the company the more the employer has paid you back for the tools you own to make the company money.
    Sounds like you should be going to on-line/night classes in order to find a better company to work for. The companies that have the most Techs in the schools make the best employers.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    226
    Torches, digital scale, manifold gauges, micron gauge, combustion analyzer, refrigerant leak detector, gas leak detector, sawzall, cordless drill, hammer drill, multi meter, pressure gauge, hand tools, and much more I cant think of off the top of my head is supplied by the tech.

    If a tool wears out, breaks, gets lost, stolen or whatever the tech replaces it with a new one ASAP. If you cant afford to replace it at the time then the company pays for it and takes it out of your paycheck in payments.

    Also youre expected to share tools with other employees if they need something you have that makes the job easier, which as you can guess means your tools dont last nearly as long as they would have.

    I get the same for tools as I do for being on call, nothing.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stongsville Oh
    Posts
    893
    P.T. Barnum was right, There's one born every minute!
    ckartson
    I didn't write the book I just read it!

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Here. I'm right here i tell you!
    Posts
    465

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Wild View Post
    Torches, digital scale, manifold gauges, micron gauge, combustion analyzer, refrigerant leak detector, gas leak detector, sawzall, cordless drill, hammer drill, multi meter, pressure gauge, hand tools, and much more I can’t think of off the top of my head is supplied by the tech.

    If a tool wears out, breaks, gets lost, stolen or whatever the tech replaces it with a new one ASAP. If you can’t afford to replace it at the time then the company pays for it and takes it out of your paycheck in payments.

    Also you’re expected to share tools with other employees if they need something you have that makes the job easier, which as you can guess means your tools don’t last nearly as long as they would have.

    I get the same for tools as I do for being on call, nothing.
    I would start looking for another place to work and if you find something better tell them where to shove their tool policy. If it gets worn out or broke on their job they should replace it and it still should be your property.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    1,025
    Just me $.02 but as a technician, I like having my own tools. It must be that most guys roam from company to company. I have been at my current company for about 6 months and don't plan on ever leaving, except if I start my own business.

    I have never worked for a company that had a tool policy. I always figured that it was another asset that I brought to the table when pay was negotiated. I also want to help and support the company that I work for as much as I can.

    I figure it like this, if I set aside $30.00 a week for tools that is not so much a big deal. I do not let other techs use my tools. I take good care of them. They do not break. Now drill bits and saws all blades my boss will buy, batteries too. I buy as much as I can so that adds to my value and I get paid well for doing that. In the end I like the feeling of being self sufficient.

    I think that the solution is to get paid well enough by having the tools to be the best professional that you can be that a few thousand dollars worth of tools is not that big a deal. Besides, there is some tax benefit too.

    Now flame me if you like for my way of thinking ...

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stongsville Oh
    Posts
    893
    Thank God for collective bargaining agreements. I worked for 5 years non union and 25 years as a union member. The first 5 years I worked for a company that supplied most tools. There were some items they didn't feel were important such as a micron gage for example. We as techs know the importance of this item. I didn't feel it was my responsibility to run out and buy one. This is how they want to represent themselves to their customers then so be it. Look out customer today your service tech may have a micron gage, tomorrow he may not. I would also hate to go through a job interview and testing for a job, only to find I didn't get it though I proved my qualifications, because someone else had a more complete tool list. Maybe you should supply your own vehicle too so the company can put their name on it and you can help further. You would definitely be hired over someone else for that. Maybe we all should so we can level the playing field. Maybe I should buy a crane so I can set equipment too, that would help. Many of the tools that I bought 30 year ago are outdated by todays standards. Halide leak detector for instance. Should I have to upgrade to keep up with changing technology? What about laptops, should the company install proprietary software on your personal laptop or are you saying that the tech should buy his own software too. The reason I brought up our collective bargaining agreement is that we have a list of tools that we are required to own, the company provides the rest. Most companys realize the importance of providing equipment needed to do a job, even if it has to be shared because it's an expensive item. We as techs must take care of the equipment supplied, part of that is informing managers if a tool is failing so it can be repaired before it gets to the point of having to be replaced. This is my idea of "helping out". Actually it's called doing my "job".
    ckartson
    I didn't write the book I just read it!

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Metro Atlanta
    Posts
    70
    If the tech is supposed to provide a mojority or all of their own tools, they are becoming a sub-contractor for the company. Therefore are incurring more overhead than their time and knkowledge and should be compensated for it! If you keep losing tools and they are the companys, my guess is youre first up on the chopping block anyway. I have heard a story of a tech having his van totally cleaned out, twice in 1 year, by "thieves" and police reports were filed both times. After getting more new tools he misteriously quit the company 6 months later and started his own company! coincidence?? But there are always going to be shady people, best way to deal with it is fire them!

  10. #49
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South of Heaven
    Posts
    1,133
    Maybe I should buy a crane so I can set equipment too, that would help.
    I have to admit...I lost a shot of Jim Beam when I read that...ROFL.

    My dad was an auto mechanic ( Mercedes - Benz ) for 48 years. A thousand dollars does not buy much on a Snap - On truck...( I learned this when I was very young ) .

    Ok , so we're in a different business for sure. I have decided ( from this post ) that the folks under me will provide one set of gauges and a DMM ( and thermometer )( and all tools below ). The company will provide micron gauge / vac pump and above. Stolen tools...if the company van has half of the side door ripped off ( from the hockey puk lock ) there is no issue. Beyond that...I don't know.

    The first posts stated that thier company provided ALL tools. To me , that would feel like wearing someone elses socks or something...I don't know. But thanks for all replies...it helped me answer my question for sure.

    I never considered a crane...but I worked for a company that had a device called a " Superman Lift " . It had a seat on a long aluminum pole with wheels and a hand crank winch. We lifted alot of stuff with that thing...even after they were " outlawed ". I kinda miss that thing actually.

    edit : and imagine a guy showing up to fill out an application that had his own van with a " Superman " strapped on the roof ( with all of the ladders ). I'd be like ...whoa..." sir , that guy aint no damned good " ...LOL.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by yorktek37 View Post
    I would start looking for another place to work and if you find something better tell them where to shove their tool policy. If it gets worn out or broke on their job they should replace it and it still should be your property.
    I agree that its BS that a tech should be providing such expensive tools. I disagree that you should just look for another job and tell the owner to shove it, but maybe I'm just being a sucker as ckartson said.

    To me anything beyond the basic hand tools is something the company should pay for and if not then I should be compensated by hourly wage when nothing else is set in place.

    To me I ask for an extra $3 an hour to cover it. What do you guys think? With the tools I listed its roughly 5-6 Gs in tools.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    british columbia
    Posts
    94
    the other guys or should i say employees of the company wouldnt dare ask to borrow tools they would get an answer like get your own tools or rent the tool you need and it always ends up i have to do the job because i have the hilti or the combustion analyzer when the other ones are sitting in the bosses van so i end up getting more hours

  13. #52
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Colorado flatland native
    Posts
    15,067
    I supply every tool on the trucks. I also get pissed if theyre trying to work with dull drill bits, hole saws, etc. "Jesus you guys! You just spent 30 minutes trying to drill a hole with a dull bit! You know where they sell new ones! REPLACE THOSE!"
    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

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