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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    876
    Trane condenser coils are made of aluminum and can be repaired.
    .,
    It is also possible to replace just the coil if it is still available.

    Either would be cheaper than replacing the whole heat pump system.
    I am for doing good to the poor, but...I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. I observed...that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.
    ― Benjamin Franklin

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    golden horseshoe
    Posts
    16
    check all connections first

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    707
    Quote Originally Posted by allan38 View Post
    Trane condenser coils are made of aluminum and can be repaired.
    .,
    It is also possible to replace just the coil if it is still available.

    Either would be cheaper than replacing the whole heat pump system.
    How? I have tried aluminum welding and epoxy. They will last about a year and you can see both the epoxy and the weld coming loose from the original tubing. Any info would be apreciated.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    707
    I do recommend you get a second opinion. Because as some one stated before. A leak in the condensor coil would loose all of its freon within days. And it could possible be in a connection or distributer tube that can be repaired. I have found that most leaks in tranes is at the evap coils.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,567
    Quote Originally Posted by meoberry View Post
    How? I have tried aluminum welding and epoxy. They will last about a year and you can see both the epoxy and the weld coming loose from the original tubing. Any info would be apreciated.
    Let me start by saying that I have exactly ZERO experience repairing Trane coils.

    It is possible to repair an aluminum coil, however.

    http://uniweld.com/Larger_View/uni4300_1lg.jpg

    That is the stuff that I use. It is a trick to get done, but I have repairs that have lasted for years in a low temp application with hot gas defrost.

    I get it at United.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,368
    Quote Originally Posted by meoberry View Post
    How? I have tried aluminum welding and epoxy. They will last about a year and you can see both the epoxy and the weld coming loose from the original tubing. Any info would be apreciated.
    Here ya go.
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  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,567

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,368
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    Really?

    It's that easy?

    Do they come in different sizes? Do they LAST?
    Yup pretty easy. I believe they come in only 3/8, but I could be mistaken.

    I've used them once or twice with no further issues.
    Make your expertise uniquely valuable.

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  9. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,567

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    omaha
    Posts
    343

    Talking

    at least two sizes available, so far so good

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    KIT 01146 is for 3/8" tubing, which is what is used in all the residential equipment.
    That same kit has been available for at least 15 years. It has probably been available since the 60's when GE first started making units with spine fin coils, but I can only speak for its availability for the last 15 years I've been doing service work.

    There is another kit for the 1/2" spine fin tubing used in old GE/Trane commercial equipment.

    If you follow the instructions and install the thing correctly, it is a permanent leak free repair, even for R-410A equipment.

    Sometimes, due to access limitations due to the location of the leak, you may have to think outside the box a bit.
    The last one I did I used 2 of the kits and about 10" of 3/8 copper pipe to repair one leak.
    The leak was right in the center of where all the copper lines passes under the coil on a XL1400 heat pump that has a double coil, so there were several copper pipes crossing under there, and not enough room to work. I cut the spine fin tubing on either side of where all the pipes passed under, and spliced in a piece of copper pipe with a coupler on each end.

    I keep 2 of the 3/8" kits on my truck. I may go 2 or 3 years in between needing one, but then end up needing 2 in one day.

    Fortunately the cabinet design changes in 2002 pretty much eliminated the most common cause of leaks in AS/Trane outdoor units.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  12. #25
    Again guys, thanks so much for the information. I'm printing all of this out and forwarding this to the guy who did the inspection. I called my realtor and she called the inspector who called me yesterday. There's a good chance part of this can be covered by the insurance on my home inspection.

    I wasn't with him all the time. He showed me the "wand" and said that meant it was leaking.

    Jack
    PS: I talked to the home inspector yesterday. He turned on the AC but said he didn't turn on the heating part of the units as it was above 65 degrees. I had misunderstood what he meant.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,567
    Quote Originally Posted by dehavenphoto View Post
    Again guys, thanks so much for the information. I'm printing all of this out and forwarding this to the guy who did the inspection. I called my realtor and she called the inspector who called me yesterday. There's a good chance part of this can be covered by the insurance on my home inspection.

    I wasn't with him all the time. He showed me the "wand" and said that meant it was leaking.

    Jack
    PS: I talked to the home inspector yesterday. He turned on the AC but said he didn't turn on the heating part of the units as it was above 65 degrees. I had misunderstood what he meant.
    He will need to use a soap solution to pinpoint the leak before any repairs can be made. The 'wand' or electronic leak detectors are great for finding the general location of a leak, but rarely can the pinpoint a leak with any degree of accuracy. Only a good soap solution can do that.

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