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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Coastal Georgia
    Posts
    34,902

    Benncools post reflects how experience and time in trade can sometimes collide with what is taught in trade and tech schools. I`ll take experience every time.

  2. #15
    Well since electricians were bashed, I must chime in. Is it code? Definitley. Is it pretty? Naw. Emt is NOT an outdoor product so, no, it should NOT have been used. Even with compression fittings it's still a no no. PVC would have done the job probably faster and easier but, let's face it, after one summer it would have looked exactly the same as the flex. I seriously doubt any electrician would have done any other way except for maybe running low as not to ruin the view. Rigid would have been your next option but not very cost effective. In any case, nice piping job.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Sherwood Park Alberta
    Posts
    498
    Nice piping Bencool

    But I trust there is allowable airflow clearance between the units.

    The picture is probably making the units look jammed close to each other than they probably are.


    Servicepro

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864

    Servicepro

    This was the orginal post of the condensing units after they got hit with snow off the roof. Check out the roofs over the self contained packaged units in the back. Believe it or not the constant breeze off the mountain keeps the air from short cycling.



    This is the "after" shot. Actually the only think that got destroyed was the condensers but the insurance pay for new units.


    [Edited by benncool on 07-25-2003 at 03:06 PM]

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Sherwood Park Alberta
    Posts
    498

    Ben

    WoW!! Did they get crunched!!

    Keep up the good work!

    Servicepro

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    most of the time in the Philippines
    Posts
    1,211
    I see you pushed on the armaflex- makes for a neater looking job. I can't tell from the pix if the suction lines are sloped, but I assume they are. It looks like you cut the armaflex and solidly clamped the suction line to the strut? Most guys will put a clamp over the outside of the insulation which I disagree with. I want the tubing solid to the unistrut with a cush a clamp. Nice looking job. Maybe next time, lengthen the strut and tell the elctricians to use it, They don't, they do it over on their nickel. Last summer I put in 2 new Bally freezer units on a 20 x 20 walk in. I had two nice 3 foot high stands made to put the CU's on. [keep the grass out of the condenser coils and for working hieght; don't have to lay on the ground to work on them] Electrician drilled several holes right thru one leg of the stand to run his conduit even though I had extra unistrut from my pipe supports in place for him.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Oh yeah. Put up a piece of unistrut and the electician thinks you put it up out of the kindness of your heart just for his use. Generally he'll run his conduit right down the middle if you don't guard your hanger.

    This goes for roofs too. "The "refer-guy" put the hole and pitch box in the roof just for me. Just to show my graditude I'll drill my disconnect to this this fin thingy.
    I wonder what that hissing is? No problem it stop hissing."

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    970
    Or he'll mount the disconnect right over the rating plate.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3

    Confused

    I can tell by the posts that I am outclassed on experience, but I am troubled that by looking at the pads it seems that you have reinstalled those units right where the were crushed before. Also, starbrite on high sitting copper seems an obvious breaking point when the snow falls. Job security?.......... Just wondering

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Originally posted by gtrplyr
    I can tell by the posts that I am outclassed on experience, but I am troubled that by looking at the pads it seems that you have reinstalled those units right where the were crushed before. Also, starbrite on high sitting copper seems an obvious breaking point when the snow falls. Job security?.......... Just wondering

    We did give the owners an option to move these units to the gable end of the building. But you have to realize that we are just pawns in this big mess.

    The architect is the one who insisted that the units be on the side of the building. So now he is responsible to build a shelter over the units so that they won't get crushed next winter. Then you have the insurance company involved. And you have the general contractor involved. It is not our decision as to where these units will go. That's the plan to build a mighty shelter before the snow flys. Not MY plan. But it is a plan.

    I have all the confidence in the StayBrite solder in the way we used it on this job.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    970
    Staybrite is stronger than silfos (higher tensile strength} Good shi*t.

  12. #25
    look at the wireing a littel closer. that is not the electritions. that is the controle wireing.it is the controles guys fault.

  13. #26
    Nice work!!

    The electricians should be fired though.

    Makes me sick to see quality work next to that!!

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