Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 35
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    77
    One of the best intro's to my specialty is Dan Holohan- Hydronic...Heat...

    http://www.heatinghelp.com/shopcart/...m?category=2-2

    Lots of other good books on that site too.

    I also agree 100% with timebuilder that you should get as much education as possible.

    John Prine said it best:

    So I'm sitting in a hotel
    Trying to write a song
    My head is just as empty
    As the day is long
    Why it's clear as a bell
    I should have gone to school
    I'd be wise as an owl
    Stead of stubborn as a mule.

    from- It's A Big Old Goofy World

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    northern kentucky
    Posts
    143
    My 2 cents, UA has good training and the more you know the more you are worth

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    122
    597 rocks , bull**** on the UA paying a lower wage for aprentaces ,I know non union guys that are great at what they do and have 20 + years in the field ,and dont make as much an hour as a first year apprentice ,because they dont want to join the Union and put the time in , I got in the UA local 597 and took all the classes they had 2 to 3 nights a week for several years ,and when they opened the new school I started to take the classes again, taken some of the classes 3 times . the cool thing about the UA is if you become an aprentice you go to school during part of the week and work with a contractor the rest of the week. and get paid for all your time ,if you get hired by a contractor because you have experince ,you have to take the classes on your own time but, all the Ua classes (in chicago area ,not sure of other areas) are free ,I worked as a nonunion service guy for 13 years b4 I found a place that got me in , during my nonunion time I payed for classes that came nowhere close to the quality of the union classes . Dan Holohan also has a great website. he also does seminars for the MCA in chicago twice a year cost us in 597 $25.00 for them , if you look at his sight his seminars are usually $125 + been to his dead men steam twice , his book lost art of steam heat is a must have
    You have to do your own growing no matter how tall your grandfather was

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    10
    My Pay for me has been the following

    Large Company - Non union

    1st year apprentice - 10hr
    2nd year- 12hr
    3rd year- 15hr
    4th year- 17hr
    1st year through 5 year as a non union journeyman - 19-22hr



    Union journeyman when i was hired - 30.45hr

    And now currently - 36.50hr

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    122
    think the aprentices start at $18 or $19hr journeyman scale is $43.05 , most I made as a nonunion mech was $22hr and was one of the 2 top mechanics at the shop ,had 8 years at that shop the other top guy made $24hr and he had 42 years at that shop ,when I left there for a union shop the service manager said all I can offer you is $28hr ,I played it off and told him I guess I can probably get by on that. the other nice thing about the UA is your insurance is thru the union so you dont have to pay $500 month for crappy cobra insurance when you change jobs ,your insurance stay with you from job to job
    You have to do your own growing no matter how tall your grandfather was

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    19,527
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinCorr View Post
    One of the best intro's to my specialty is Dan Holohan- Hydronic...Heat...

    http://www.heatinghelp.com/shopcart/...m?category=2-2

    Lots of other good books on that site too.

    I also agree 100% with timebuilder that you should get as much education as possible.

    John Prine said it best:

    So I'm sitting in a hotel
    Trying to write a song
    My head is just as empty
    As the day is long
    Why it's clear as a bell
    I should have gone to school
    I'd be wise as an owl
    Stead of stubborn as a mule.

    from- It's A Big Old Goofy World
    I had the pleasure of knowing Prine when he was a much younger man, and his voice was clear as a bell. It seems like a different life....
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    windy city
    Posts
    4,444
    journeyman pay starts at 43.05. it goes wherever the agreement is made with the employer

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    122
    heavymetaldad said it, but let me add one more thing ,scale is min wage, you can negotiate for more, thing is if your over scale you better be good
    You have to do your own growing no matter how tall your grandfather was

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    windy city
    Posts
    4,444
    Quote Originally Posted by sidecarr View Post
    heavymetaldad said it, but let me add one more thing ,scale is min wage, you can negotiate for more, thing is if your over scale you better be good

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    19,527
    Quote Originally Posted by bt84 View Post
    Can you suggest any good hvac learning books, I have completed tech school and would like to keep my education going. If you had any suggestions let me hear them. I also welcome any old fart advice that you are willing to give.
    There are a lot of HVAC books you could read, but they are not the books I'd recommend. Most of HVAC is truly a hands-on learning process, either in class or in the field. Very few people can pull technical information out of a book and successfully digest it into their memory and decision making processes. You need to be able to apply the information, or it is almost useless to you.

    For example, when I taught my college class in Instrument Flying, I could explain the effects of a turn on a magnetic compass, but almost no one would get that mental "light to go on" until they saw what happens in the actual aircraft. Sure, you can study the fundamentals until they are second nature, but that "eureka!" moment happens when you are in front of a unit that is misbehaving.

    Instead of limiting yourself to HVAC books, you can entertain yourself and grow mentally at the same time by reading some classic literature.

    As recently as the early 50's, most educated people had read the Bible, at least once. Most had read some Shakespeare, if nothing else, a scene from Hamlet or Macbeth. A good course in high school would have taught both of them. And, of course, Romeo and Juliet.

    Here are some of the classics I read from 7th to 9th grade.

    http://classiclit.about.com/library/...l-9th-read.htm

    I'd also throw in some John Steinbeck, such as Travels With Charlie, and for creepiness, Edgar Allen Poe's The Cask of Amontillado or The Telltale Heart.

    If you want to go deeper, try Homer's Odyssey or The Iliad. Both are excellent.

    Dickens, Austen, Bronte...there is so much more.

    Now, a lot of people will tell you that none of this is necessary. Carefully regard who it is that tells you that, and decide if you want to be that person, or someone with a little more going on "up there."
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  11. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    There are a lot of HVAC books you could read, but they are not the books I'd recommend. Most of HVAC is truly a hands-on learning process, either in class or in the field. Very few people can pull technical information out of a book and successfully digest it into their memory and decision making processes. You need to be able to apply the information, or it is almost useless to you.

    For example, when I taught my college class in Instrument Flying, I could explain the effects of a turn on a magnetic compass, but almost no one would get that mental "light to go on" until they saw what happens in the actual aircraft. Sure, you can study the fundamentals until they are second nature, but that "eureka!" moment happens when you are in front of a unit that is misbehaving.

    Instead of limiting yourself to HVAC books, you can entertain yourself and grow mentally at the same time by reading some classic literature.

    As recently as the early 50's, most educated people had read the Bible, at least once. Most had read some Shakespeare, if nothing else, a scene from Hamlet or Macbeth. A good course in high school would have taught both of them. And, of course, Romeo and Juliet.

    Here are some of the classics I read from 7th to 9th grade.

    http://classiclit.about.com/library/...l-9th-read.htm

    I'd also throw in some John Steinbeck, such as Travels With Charlie, and for creepiness, Edgar Allen Poe's The Cask of Amontillado or The Telltale Heart.

    If you want to go deeper, try Homer's Odyssey or The Iliad. Both are excellent.

    Dickens, Austen, Bronte...there is so much more.

    Now, a lot of people will tell you that none of this is necessary. Carefully regard who it is that tells you that, and decide if you want to be that person, or someone with a little more going on "up there."
    Thank you for the advice on hvac books, I don't want to spend money if i don't have to. As far as the other books go I have read most of them and they are among some of my favorites. I am not some illiterate fool of a young man with no education. I love to read and do enjoy a great book so if you have any more books that you would recommend that would be greatly appreciated. And by the way The Cask of Amontillado is my favorite story ever.
    Last edited by bt84; 07-19-2009 at 08:03 PM. Reason: missed a word

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    77

    fun books

    I like Richard Russo. His newest one is Bridge of Sighs. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/24/books/24masl.html

    The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Chabon was the well deserved winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Lit in 2001.

    So many!!!!

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    19,527
    Quote Originally Posted by bt84 View Post
    Is the UA a good union to join. Will they help me find a job since im unemployed and have No experience. If you know anything about them and would recommend or not let me know.
    Since you have read the books I recommended, I would encourage you to reflect that experience in your writing. All of it. How many errors can you find in your original post?

    A recent survey shows a high percentage of HR managers who find ONE error on a resume will place that missal in circular file #13.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event