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Thread: Is this safe?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    24

    Is this safe?

    I am currently investigating other issues with my system, and I noticed something today that worry's me. Attached is the gas vent for my system. When I had my heat pump put in (mainly for AC) I wanted a filter better then the screens that came with the furnace. The only place the contractor could find to put it in was above the furnace. The furnace is a down draft? (the coil is below the furnace). The contractor put in the 4" filter directly above the furnace. The vent pipe as shown in the picture was not change much from what you see. (the water heater is beside the furnace and the two vents join each other in a Y and then goes up through the roof.

    My concern is that the cover for the filter is not sealed in any way (no rubber or foam seal of any type -?is this normal?).

    It is very rear that the gas furnace kicks on as the temp in my area generally does not drop below 30 and when it does, it usually is not more then 10 days or so a year (excluding the last two years that is).

    The vent is not sealed. If the furnace was to kick on, is there a chance that exhaust gases could be sucked into the return by leaks in the filter door?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    PA
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    It shouldn't.
    Depends on if your basement has enough free air.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Okmulgee, OK
    Posts
    184
    It's ok to me. In fact, that flue pipe actually runs through the blower compartment of that particular furnace.
    It's just rocket science. It's not like it's heat and air work or something.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    24

    Its in my guarage

    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    It shouldn't.
    Depends on if your basement has enough free air.
    Inside garage. Only "ventilation" provided is what is able to get past the garage door.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    PA
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    If you have a good tight seal on that door. Then you may want to worry about it.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    24

    Not sure what you mean by tight.

    It's 18 or so years old, so I am sure it is not tight compared to modern standards. There is some light under the door. Side seals seem ok. Door to house has a good seal (it's new as I had to replace it, has magnetic cling to door).

    I added a more zoomed back picture to show the rest of the vent system. The system was inspected when the HP was added...
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    Last edited by FrankD; 07-07-2009 at 12:19 AM. Reason: add detail.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Understand that the furnace door isn't air tight either.

    Provide combustion air ,to be safe.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
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    You should probably consider a combustion air intake.
    You should have 50 cubic foot of free space for every 1000 BTUs of input for your gas appliances.

    So if your furnace is an 80,000BTU input, and your water heater is a 32,000 BTU input.
    Your garage should have a volume of 5,600 cubic foot.
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