duct cleaning - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 24 of 24

Thread: duct cleaning

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    27
    You've been given some good advice. The best so far I have read for you is that you do not get into this field unless you are at least studying HVAC. In fact no one in my state will be given permission, bus lic, ect. to do any work duct cleaning or other wise unless you possess the requires hvac contractor lic. Which requires one to know the trade along with other bis. information. And this is for good reason. Because in order for you to do the job correctly its going to involve more than just sending a brush down the supply floor vent. That said You need to check out NADCA. National Air Duct Cleaners Association. They are the group who writes the standards for this field. I would take them seriously, as there are many contractors out there who do not understand the need nor the know how, and many don't want to spend the time nor the money in order to do what is necessary. If you get in touch with these guys and respect what they have to teach you and keep yourself from making the same mistake as do so many others you'll do fine.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    289
    I agree that anyone cleaning ducts should have at least a basic understanding of the type of system they are cleaning along with the knowledge of how to clean each of its components safely and that includes the entire air handling portion of the system, not just the ducts. Common sense tells me that if its dirty and comes into contact with the air stream, then it needs cleaned, but don't expect NADCA to teach you any of this.

    I honestly can't see how they or any organization can claim to have a standard for cleaning that doesn't take a hard look at the various types of cleaning equipment being used and specify exactly what must be cleaned and how!
    Last edited by options; 11-02-2009 at 05:29 PM. Reason: typo
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    27

    NADCA

    Nadca agrees with you. That is on the issue of what to clean. They state that if it does come in contact with the air stream that it does need to be cleaned. They do list out techniques that should be followed in the process of cleaning. Now I don't remember them ever recommending any company or type of equipment. But they do say that the only process they approve of is the push pull method under negative air. Now I know that leaves allot for the imagination. But than again that also inspires innovation. There are companies on the market that manufacture equipment that will perform this method. I'm not saying NADCA is perfect. Nor am I saying that they are finished. Have you seen an Electricians code book from yester year it was say 1/2"-1" thick. Now what size is it? So my point is that they are in the infant stages of this and will make improvements. Though I do think they are doing well.

  4. #17
    I worked for a company a couple years back doing duct cleaning. We had top of the line equipment and took anywhere from 4 to 8 hours to do a job. Houses with multiple furnaces were split up over a couple days. I was taught to use push pull techniques with compressed air as well as brush systems. It really can be a very profitable area to get into these days. We did the best job we could and took pictures on a digital camera inside the ducts to show the customers. Always was a surprise to see a build up of dust in the cold air returns to the customer. Also sold a sanitizer and smoke eater that went in the ducts.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    289
    NADCA was formed 20 years ago so I think that they are well beyond their infancy and while ACR 2006 does address some of these issues, to the best of my knowledge NADCA has yet to do anything to bring member companies into compliance with the cleaning aspects of it and until they do their standards aren't worth the paper they are printed on.

    For those who haven't seen it, here's a link to ACR 2006:
    https://nadca.com/download/ACR%20200...rch%202006.pdf
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    27
    Well, I was trying to convey the idea that NADCA has not been around very long. And you help prove my point. NADCA was started in 1989, while the National Electricians Code (NEC) was written in 1897. So the NEC has been around for 92 years longer than NADCA. In addition the current NADCA standard of 2006 consist of 49 pages, the current NEC code consist of 1,000 pages with the NFPA writing another 1,100 pages for commentary. So I do not think that we should expect these standards to be adopted as code yet. Because until they are adopted as code they are only standards. But I will say that this day I speak of is coming. We'll adopt them as a new Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Code or they will be added to the current Mechanical Code. But more will be added to the HVAC Codes each year. As it should because in my opinion the International Mechanical Code 2006 does little for IAQ. But don't hold your breath, it may be some 92 years from now. How's 2101 sound?

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    109

    Nadca

    Nadca was a good idea for someone to make money. Yes they have their guidelines, which are good for someone who doesn't know about hvac. But have you seen their membership fees? They are outrageous, I want to know why a contractor should have to pay this much money to get a Nadca patch on their arm. It just doesn't seem justified to me.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    289
    Nor I and with only about 1000 members worldwide NADCA will never be an effective organization until they raise their membership standards and create a separate classification and more affordable price for those smaller companies that clean residential and smaller commercial jobs only. They also need an equipment standard that eliminates glorified shop vacs from ever being used.

    Asking a blo & go to sign an ethics statement is a joke! You can't have a standard that says clean the entire system and not require all of your certified techs to know how and to comply. NADCA should also require a certified tech on every job and they should also be pushing for a separate hvac classification for those techs. Those cleaning the system don't need to know how to install or service it, but they do need to know the basics and how to safely and thoroughly clean all of it.

    ameritech - you are comparing apples to lemons. The NEC is very specific about what needs done, while the majority of the ACR is written in general terms only and permits the company doing the work to decide what they will do and how.
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    109
    A logical person would see that in order to work on a component of a system, the entire entity should be understood. Take for example a veterinarian. You couldn't just bathe a dog, and not know how to repair it's broken leg. A good basic understanding is not that difficult to attain but as far as nadca is concerned, the contractor should just have to sign an ethics form and follow their standards. If this is how it was meant to be I would've been performing surgeries on horses long ago.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    289
    NADCA is run by a management company and when asked about his experience here's what their executive director said and I quote:

    "You asked about my experience regarding HVAC cleaning. My profession is association management. I have worked with HVAC-related associations throughout my career (17 years), including Association of Water Technologies (AWT), Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors (PHCC) and NADCA. With each of these groups, I was involved with the technical aspects fo the industry and worked on a lot training programs (among other things). During my tenure with NADCA I have been onsite for several commercial and residential HVAC cleaning and restoration projects, including a job yesterday. I talk to a lot of people in the industry, I participate on a bunch of committees and I speak with a lot of residential and commercial customers. Based on that, I think I have a pretty good read on things and I learn more all the time."

    He also said " What makes sense to me is to get away from selling services on the basis of equipment, which does nothing but confuse consumers. Instead, commit to a level of service (in writing) and provide visual proof of meeting that level of service. This works for a lot of industries and could work for our industry. The question is, do you think you will be successful focusing on your equipment, or will you be more effective focusing on the results you deliver?"

    The blo & go's have got to love NADCA. All they have to do is state in writing that they will clean the ducts and show each customer a few feet of the most easily accessed ductwork before and after to prove it.
    Last edited by options; 11-09-2009 at 09:18 AM. Reason: typo
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    109
    So basically, if you witness something you become an expert on it. I've watched lots of movies. Does that mean I can be a director?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event