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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,873
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Harper View Post
    Quote from sweatlodge article : A Sweat Ceremony in many traditions usually starts with the loading and offering of the sacred chanunpa ~ "peace pipe".

    This explains a lot about the Dangling Wrangler


    That reminds me of something Iggy Pop said many,many years ago,
    "I might be sober,but I can still think stoned thoughts."
    Last edited by the dangling wrangler; 06-20-2009 at 03:11 PM.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Several Miles from Sane
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by the dangling wrangler View Post
    I've learned to love to hate this career.
    I never really thought about your extreme.
    Ten below in the snow.
    Oh Yea, I was thawing water lines under a mobile home once at -15. We had the fire Sprinkler Lines Freeze once inside a building, the walk in cooolers were the only heat and they all locked out on low pressure. I don't know how Psychobilly does it in AZ, that is just Too hot ! I've been in Phoenix at 112 and could not conceive working on anything to do with A/C (except turning the t-stat down and having a nice cold beer).

    It's not uncommon for us to see -10 to 105 around here (Colorado) but we don't get humidity. People complain when it get to 65% Rh. I was in the Little Apple (Manhattan KS) once when I swear that I could see the humidity, felt like it was 105 %, I hate humidity!!!!!
    If sense were so common everyone would have it !

    All opinions expressed are my own. Any advice provided is based on personal experience, generally accepted fact or publicly available information. As such, it is worth exactly what you paid for it, not a penny more not a penny less !!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Plainfield, Illinois
    Posts
    15
    I would suggest checking out some of the pipefitter or sheet metal union apprenticeship programs....that's how I got my start....good luck.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,131

    Confused deal with it????????

    Quote Originally Posted by PSYCHOBILLY View Post
    I also love this trade.
    And it gets very hot on the roofs here during the summer. Sometimes up to 150*f on a day without any wind. You learn to deal with it. And kinda get used to it. When me and my buddies are at the lake and they say its hot, I laugh and say its nice outside.
    how do you learn to deal with those conditions , i read a trade paper on working in Vegas and it said you have to wear long sleeves , start early inna a.m. and drink a ton of water as you lose it so fast u don't even sweat. True???????? and that was for the install guys , we service techs can't control what part of the day calls come in .............Jack
    Last edited by rojacman; 06-24-2009 at 05:28 PM. Reason: spelling

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Beautiful, Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love!
    Posts
    1,096
    Let me give you some advice given to me by my father. Whatever position you end up in, make yourself indispensable.

    As a father in these modern times I passed that advice on to my children, but I also added in my advice "whatever you do just don't Suck at it" and you will make a good living, maybe even get rich.

    I am not saying that I am some knight in shining armor, but 80% or more of what I see done in the mechanical trades in my area is done by folks who work only for money, and hate their jobs. These folks run from every challenge, they just want to hump a new unit into place and have no care if their work adds any value to the customer.

    10 years ago I stopped all advertising, not one of our trucks is lettered, and I don't have a web page. My phone rings about 30 times a day, I get 99.9% of all my sales.
    We are in most cases the highest bidder or the only bidder, my suppliers are paid instantly.
    We never return any material unless the supplier made the mistake.

    Most days I really love to go to work, especially when I walk into a call that 5 other guys gave up on. I know when I fix that unit the customer will not care how much I charge them, and that is good.

    Btw, if I walk into a property that has an install like the ones I see on the "wall of shame"
    I will quote the rip out the entire job and redo it or I will walk away from the customer.

    So if you want to get into HVAC just to have security, then just don't suck and you will have it. I personally could not work for anyone, I have in the past, but couldn't get any satisfaction in doing half a s s work, and going behind an installer that needs a bullet.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Memphis, TN.
    Posts
    823
    Preface this by saying I have not read the first part of this thread but.....


    If I had it to do over again I WOULD NOT have gone into HVAC. The wages (for the most part) are so low you can not support a family and there usually is no benefits.

    My area (midwest) pays a 10+ yr service tech an average of 12-15 dollars an hour, no truck to drive home, no health benefits and on call 1 week per month minimum with no compensation other than the O.T. for the calls...all this to usually get laid off during the "slow periods". Happens all the time here and they get away with it! Now you know why there are so many "hacks"! (Translation: Guys trying to get by).

    Had I to do it over again I would have gone to sparky school...those guys can make the money man!


    Just my opinion...


    CW.
    "I don't care what you could get it off the net for, they wont warranty it and neither will I"!

    And if you don't like my "flat rate up front pricing" try and negotiate the price on that big mac you just bought pricing is exactly the same method!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,379
    Quote Originally Posted by citywide service View Post
    Preface this by saying I have not read the first part of this thread but.....


    If I had it to do over again I WOULD NOT have gone into HVAC. The wages (for the most part) are so low you can not support a family and there usually is no benefits.

    My area (midwest) pays a 10+ yr service tech an average of 12-15 dollars an hour, no truck to drive home, no health benefits and on call 1 week per month minimum with no compensation other than the O.T. for the calls...all this to usually get laid off during the "slow periods". Happens all the time here and they get away with it! Now you know why there are so many "hacks"! (Translation: Guys trying to get by).

    Had I to do it over again I would have gone to sparky school...those guys can make the money man!


    Just my opinion...


    CW.
    I have to say, your outlook on things suck..

    I make good money, and drive my truck home. There is always something to do if you are thorough and keeping your eyes open. The hacks get laid off all the time beacuse they are hacks. Why keep a bad technician on the payroll when he cant do good work? You might be working for the wrong company.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,131

    Talking yea Joe

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Harper View Post
    I have to say, your outlook on things suck..

    I make good money, and drive my truck home. There is always something to do if you are thorough and keeping your eyes open. The hacks get laid off all the time beacuse they are hacks. Why keep a bad technician on the payroll when he cant do good work? You might be working for the wrong company.
    some good words in this thread like making yourself invaluable to your co. by being able to do anything they throw at u , especially the stuff the others will not or cannot do. be your boss' "go to" guy... But i like what u said about keeping your eyes open , i call that concept being proactive , not only focusing on the one problem at hand but the whole picture. Don't tell me that every mechanical room u work in dosen,'t have a leaking pump , plugged motor overheating , static press too low inna boiler circuit , etc... to suggest to the cust. I'd get extra work almost every day that way. hone your communication skills and talk to these people , you'll be surprised at the amt. of work you can drum up. I never ask for a raise in my whole career , i always got merit raises by applying the above way of servicing , remember , proactive habits will get u where u need to go in this trade..............Jack

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    At work
    Posts
    2,441
    I love what I do. I was born to do this, I think. You meet all kinds of people and get good at dealing with them and learn something new each day. No two days are alike. Psycobilly said it right about being hot and cold and tired, though. Every place I go, the air/heat is broken, and it's busy when the weather says it is!
    Luke 6:31

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    92
    TPoz:

    What an interesting twist. I hold a private / instrument ticket (non-current BFR & medical) (no time). I'd donate body several body parts to sit left seat and get paid for it!! This is a crazy world we live in and even crazier times in America. By the way, I also intensely LOVE and intensely HATE this industry.

    Your questions certainly cover a lot of ground. If you are looking for a stop-gap to go back to flying, then don't do this. It will take you a lot longer to get really good than four years. The apprenticeship programs would be your "best" start, but in most areas, the backlogs are pretty large. Like aviation, if you want to get ahead, then be the best. Seek information, training, experience beyond what your schooling requires. Ask, watch, observe, critique, LEARN, LEARN, LEARN.

    My son has worked with me ocassionally since he was young. At a benchmark point in his life he asked me to teach him HVAC. My first reaction was NO, I love you; I can't do this to you. After a lot of talks, he elected to join the electrical apprenticeship program, and it is working very well for him.

    The day I got my private ticket, my CFI held me by the shoulders, and said "This is a license to learn. Keep scanning, keep your eyes open, and if you ever think you have arrived, stop flying." There are a lot of 400 hr comm'l pilots out there, but weigh what you know and have experienced against them. HVAC is the same. Proficiency counts, and only comes with experience. Best of luck with your next chapter in life.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    out in the country
    Posts
    633
    Quote Originally Posted by citywide service View Post
    Preface this by saying I have not read the first part of this thread but.....


    If I had it to do over again I WOULD NOT have gone into HVAC. The wages (for the most part) are so low you can not support a family and there usually is no benefits.

    My area (midwest) pays a 10+ yr service tech an average of 12-15 dollars an hour, no truck to drive home, no health benefits and on call 1 week per month minimum with no compensation other than the O.T. for the calls...all this to usually get laid off during the "slow periods". Happens all the time here and they get away with it! Now you know why there are so many "hacks"! (Translation: Guys trying to get by).

    Had I to do it over again I would have gone to sparky school...those guys can make the money man!


    Just my opinion...


    CW.
    A lot of this is caused by low balling contractors selling units over the internet just above cost......
    I never let schooling interfere with my education... Mark Twain

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Beautiful, Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love!
    Posts
    1,096
    CityWide Service,

    You need to move, I think you are in the Twilight Zone.
    Either that, or you have positioned yourself with the bottom feeders.
    I will agree with you, there are quite a few companies that pay their employees poorly, these employees are basically labor. By labor I mean these folks work for money only, they dream of getting off work and having a beer.

    There is a rule in business called the 80, 20 rule. 20% of the employees of any company do 80% of the work. The 80% try to fly under the radar hoping their boss won't notice what total slackers they are. These 80% are low paid, and are the first to be laid off.

    Now let me tell you something that might freak you out, I never hire folks that are unemployed. If you hire the unemployed, you hire an 80%'er.
    All hacks are 80%'ers. Like I said in my previous post "Make yourself indispensable" you will see your pay rocket to the top.

    I too have a love hate relationship with this business. Lately it has been mostly love, as all this new "Green" technology hits the market. This Green is going to make our industry rake in the Green, this is yet another chance to become indispensable in the market place.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Hurst, Texas, United States
    Posts
    108

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by TPoz View Post
    Hi Everyone.
    I'm an airline pilot about to lose my job along with 10,000 + others. No airlines are hiring, and wont be for approximately 4 years. I need to learn a new trade in the mean time, and preferrably as a side-line when I get back to an airline job someday.

    I've been wrenching on my own apartment units for years, but it would be nice to know HVAC to become a pro apartment manager myself...

    I am considering an HVAC school to learn a new trade, but I want to chose wisely.

    1. I live in the San Francisco Bay area. Are the prospects good for work there? .

    2. What is a good school. Online vs local Jr College?

    Appreciate any serious advice,
    Thanks,

    And don't let your kids grow up to be pilots....and if they insist, learn a trade too !!
    i would have to go with a hands on school...i attend EVEREST INST. and im bout to finish and i love it...the BEST decision iv ever made...!! GL and have fun but be careful

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