Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 234567891011 LastLast
Results 105 to 117 of 136
  1. #105
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Washington
    Posts
    536
    CAUTION: If a system has fallen into a
    contaminated state, the introduction of
    CLIPLIGHT's HVACR sealants may
    accelerate the overall failure of the
    system. Wet refrigerants laden with
    moisture or particle contamination can
    cause premature set-up of sealant
    lowering sealing capabilities and form restrictions in strainer baskets such as
    those that exist before a TXV or similar expansion device. The characteristics
    of the sealant are such that it can act as a cleaning agent picking up
    contaminants/particulate and deposit them in driers and filter screens. It is
    therefore essential that a system is clean or has filters installed to help trap
    these contaminants so they will not interfere with the performance of the unit.
    Whenever refrigerant has been recovered replace system driers. The system
    must be evacuated to remove all the non-condensables. This can only be
    accomplished by means of the triple evacuation method.
    3. PHYSICAL INSPECTION: System should be charged so that superheat and
    sub cooling is functioning at peak performance. Condensers and evaporators
    should be cleaned including blowers so that proper air/heat exchange is taking
    place.
    i. Charge system to proper operating conditions.
    ii. Check temperature of operating compressor 1 inch or 2.54 cm up
    i. LOW REFRIGERANT LEVELS: If the unit has been found to have a
    history of refrigerant leaks then a test should be performed to evaluate
    if there are non-condensable in the system. Units that are operating
    with excessive levels of non-condensable will exhibit higher than
    normal head pressures. Where the system has been fitted with proper
    isolation valves and pressure ports a comparison between the liquid
    refrigerant pressure and corresponding saturation temperature at
    ambient conditions can also help to determine if foreign gases are
    present.
    ii. ACID/ MOISTURE CONTAMINATION: The unit should be checked
    using an acid/moisture test kit and followed up with a recommended
    clean up procedure, if required. Refrigerant must be recovered and
    system evacuated to completely remove all moisture and non
    condensable. Always install a new liquid line drier each time a system
    is opened up.
    iii. BURNOUTS: Systems which have experienced a compressor
    burnout and have not under
    gone a complete flushing of
    contaminants should have the
    refrigerant recovered and a
    recommended cleanup
    procedure carried out with new
    liquid /suction driers installed.
    The Final Word In Leak Solutions 6
    from base. Readings above 130F/ 54C indicates abnormal condition,
    repair as required.
    iii. Check discharge temperature measured 1 to 2 inches or 2.54 cm to
    5.08 cm downstream of the compressor on the discharge line.
    Readings above 225F (107.2C) indicate formation of contaminants,
    repair as required.
    iv. Measure temperature across the liquid line drier to determine if a new
    drier is required. Temperature differential should be no more than
    2F/1C. On larger driers temperature or pressure differentials can
    vary therefore one should consult with manufacturers specifications to
    properly determine what is acceptable.
    v. Failure to follow these check points may result in compressor failure.
    Total Energy Management, inc

  2. #106
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    1,493
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    A leak is a Vortex, so as the refrigerant is swirling as it leaks out, a tiny bit of atmosphere is drawn back in the system, via the negative pressure in the center of the vortex.
    Sorry madhat, I gotta call BS on that one!
    The picture in my avatar is of the Houston Ship Channel and was taken from my backyard. I like to sit outside and slap mosquitos while watching countless supertankers, barges and cargo ships of every shape and size carry all sorts of deadly toxins to and fro. It's really beautiful at times.....just don't eat the three eyed fish....

    `. .` .>(((>

    `... `. .` .>(((>

    .` .>(((>

    LMAOSHMSFOAIDMT

  3. #107
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bakersfield, Ca
    Posts
    1,716
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooked View Post
    Sorry madhat, I gotta call BS on that one!
    +1 The eye of a tornado may be a vacuum but that eye is not located inside the system. I'm not a meteorologist so I may be talking out of my a.

  4. #108
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooked View Post
    Sorry madhat, I gotta call BS on that one!
    ill keep myself from being mean here....you sir are wrong!

  5. #109
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,675
    Quote Originally Posted by heater83

    ill keep myself from being mean here....you sir are wrong!
    So...

    What you guys are saying is that a leak, ANY leak, can and will draw Atmospheric air into the system?


    What documentation do you provide to back up your claims?

  6. #110
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Cicero, IN.
    Posts
    48

    GURU

    No Venturi effect here. A pinhole in a garden hose is a good example. Unless the system is in a vacumn no air will enter the system.

  7. #111
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    south jersey
    Posts
    1,104
    Never used the stuff. Too scared to try it. All though there have been times where I have been tempted. A pin hole is a pressure point as long as press is behind it. Problem is you are supposed to evacuate the system at start up. So if the pinhole was there from the beginning then air was drawn in during the vacuum process.Air already in the system can be caught by proper driers and so will the super seal. If you change the drier on the system before you add the super seal you still have to evacuate a system with a pinhle in it thus pulling in more air.

  8. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,675
    Quote Originally Posted by jnsrose
    Never used the stuff. Too scared to try it. All though there have been times where I have been tempted. A pin hole is a pressure point as long as press is behind it. Problem is you are supposed to evacuate the system at start up. So if the pinhole was there from the beginning then air was drawn in during the vacuum process.Air already in the system can be caught by proper driers and so will the super seal. If you change the drier on the system before you add the super seal you still have to evacuate a system with a pinhle in it thus pulling in more air.


    So, the super-super-sealer folks say that we need I add MORE chemicals to the system, namely DRY-R to prevent the problems caused by moisture and super-duper-sealer



    By the time you're done adding all of this crap, you'd be better off to find and fix the leak.

  9. #113
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Rockledge, Florida
    Posts
    52
    Anyone who puts that stuff in a system is crazy
    Those sealers fall into two categories the automotive sealers swell the o rings to seal the IMACA fittings on the car and the HVAC leak sealers form a silicate when reacting with air real bad news for a system
    Just crazy to use
    Can you say Invalidate a warrantee
    Clog up an expansion device
    Clog yo a drier

  10. #114
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,179
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    A leak is a Vortex, so as the refrigerant is swirling as it leaks out, a tiny bit of atmosphere is drawn back in the system, via the negative pressure in the center of the vortex.
    LOL now thats some funny shizzle right there.

    Nice try but I aint buyin it

    When i open the valve on my torches ... thats a good size leak until i light it .... you trying to tell me that during the time its not lit , theres a vortex of air entering the bottle via a swirl ?

    I wondered what all that noise was !!

    Bwahahahahha

    Oh hell thats some funny stuff

    Maybe if i put a pinole in my Nitrogen tank it will fill itsself back up

    Just where did you read that info ????

  11. #115
    Ok I'm new here and just wanted to say that Super Seal worked great for me. It does have a use. I was quoted $$$ for a coil on a 1 1/2 ton Trane that was 7 years old because it was leaking refridg out about every 4 months. The Tech showed me the leaks and I told him I would think on it a bit. I wasnt about to fork out $$$$ for a coil when the compressor could quit too in short order so I was looking at a 2 ton system for $-$K. I still wasnt happy so I looked on line and found this stuff. Cost me $$$$. I said what the heck I'm &%$#@* anyway. I had a tech come out and fill her up with R22 and then I added the super seal. It's been a year now and it hasnt lost any refridgerant. Saved me some big bucks when I didnt have it. This will give me time to save up for a new unit too. It May not be for everyone but maybe it will last 20 more years for me...who knows! Oh yeah, it cost me $$$$ to fill it back up with R22...that sucks too.

    Pricing isn't allowed
    Last edited by jpsmith1cm; 03-21-2013 at 05:21 AM.

  12. #116
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    north georiga
    Posts
    598
    i'd rather deal with super-seal than a system that isn't properly marked and may or may not have some percentage of propane in it

  13. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    "Rail" had a good experience, as many people have. However, there have been many owners who have had bad experiences - as well as the tech's who had to explain the failure somehow.

    The sealants are getting better. Right one of my personal vehicals has some sort of sealant fixing the head gasket leak. I hope for my luck to continue after the weather warms up.

    I remember reading about a Mexican tech' who saved a semiload of precious seafood with a sealant. If it had been me the compressor would have failed unexpectedly as the same time and then I would have been explaining why I didn't fix the leak instead using the sealant.

    Whenever possible, find leaks and fix them as soon as you can. Sometimes they are harder to find than other times. Sometimes you can't find them when they are very small.

Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 234567891011 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event