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  1. #1

    Ductwork in bathroom

    I'm in the process of gutting/remodeling our small half bath due to a rotten subfloor. When I pulled out the vanity I discovered there was a false bottom in it with just a register vent screwed to the kickplate. The 5 inch round ductwork stops flush with my subfloor, I was just going to buy a boot and put a floor register in. My floor joists are 16 in. on center, and there is one right next to the duct, on the other side of the duct are two floor joists sistered together (I assume for supporting the house). This leaves me a distance of 8 inches between the two joists where the 5 inch duct comes up through the floor. I can't run new duct work because my furnace is in the way, if I use flexible duct work it will hang underneath the joists and if I ever finish my basement this will cause a problem. I also don't want to put a vent in the wall because I am planning on using travartine on the walls. Does anyone have any suggestions/fixes, I would greatly appreciate it! Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2008
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ottawa Valley, Eastern Ontario, Canada
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    It would help to see it.
    I think the problem is fitting a standard 10" boot into an 8" space.
    Is the vanity being relocated?
    Can you use a different boot? (turn it 90 degrees)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    11,874
    How about duct board?

  5. #5
    Tinman,

    Yes, that is the problem I am having. I didn't want to turn it 90 degrees because then the vent would be perpendicular to my outside wall, and I don't want that. I'll try and post some pics tonight.

  6. #6
    Yes, I am replacing the vanity and putting a pedestal sink in

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Mississippi on the Golden Gulf Coast. 100 degree heat and 90% pluss humidty.
    Posts
    46
    pics would be a great help.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Biloxi, Ms.
    Posts
    176
    Just my thoughts. Why have an outlet in the bathroom? If you undercut the door and have an exhust fan in the bathroom, the room will stay the same temp as the rest of the house. This way the odor will not return to the rest of the house. In the winter house temp isn't warm enough after showers, so you need a extra heat source anyway.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
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    I personally would still want at least a small vent in a bathroom, or you're inviting milddew growth in the warmer months without ventilation to remove it. Unless oyu leave the exhaust fan running for a full 60-90 minute safter a shower, I would try and keep the vent.


    Sounds liek you may need ot custom bend some sheetmetal ot make a boot. Take some measurements of what you want and if you think it's beyond you're skills, have a contractor make it. It shouldn't cost very much... and a drop in the bucket from what it sounds like in your whole renovation project. I personally wouldn't use ductboard if you plan to seal off the pace in the future.

    See if a boot for a narrow 3-1/2" x 10" register will fit... or again, make a custom boot to go from 5" to 3-1/2"X10". It going to be behind a wall...it doesn't have to look that pretty, only be well sealed. You're probably only trying to get 50CFM out of it, so it doesn't have to be shaped perfectly. You may even want ot add a inline damper since it sound like this 5" duct is close to the furnace and therfore likely gets fed too much air anyway.

    Do it right, the first time!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    11,874
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    I personally would still want at least a small vent in a bathroom, or you're inviting milddew growth in the warmer months without ventilation to remove it. Unless oyu leave the exhaust fan running for a full 60-90 minute safter a shower, I would try and keep the vent.


    Sounds liek you may need ot custom bend some sheetmetal ot make a boot. Take some measurements of what you want and if you think it's beyond you're skills, have a contractor make it. It shouldn't cost very much... and a drop in the bucket from what it sounds like in your whole renovation project. I personally wouldn't use ductboard if you plan to seal off the pace in the future.

    See if a boot for a narrow 3-1/2" x 10" register will fit... or again, make a custom boot to go from 5" to 3-1/2"X10". It going to be behind a wall...it doesn't have to look that pretty, only be well sealed. You're probably only trying to get 50CFM out of it, so it doesn't have to be shaped perfectly. You may even want ot add a inline damper since it sound like this 5" duct is close to the furnace and therfore likely gets fed too much air anyway.

    Do it right, the first time!!!
    And the reason you wouldn't use duct board is?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
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    Quote Originally Posted by the dangling wrangler View Post
    And the reason you wouldn't use duct board is?
    For one, ductboard takes up more space...since space is at a premium the ID in a ductboard box will be smaller than a sheetmetal boot.

    Second, I'd be concerned about it's condition 30 or 40 years down the road. Being in a sealed wall, it's not going to be fun to replace. Being in a bathroom, any mold issues would require replacement. You're more likely to just get some minor rust with sheetmetal.

    But it is easier to work with and usually cheaper and you don't need any special tools. Althogh thin sheetmetal can be cut with kitchen shears and bend by hand... look as pretty and you'll need some foil tape to seal the seams and gaps without a crimper or seaming tools.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    68,601
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post

    But it is easier to work with and usually cheaper and you don't need any special tools. Althogh thin sheetmetal can be cut with kitchen shears and bend by hand... look as pretty and you'll need some foil tape to seal the seams and gaps without a crimper or seaming tools.
    You don't work with duct board or sheet metal for a living.
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  13. #13
    Here are some pics of what I'm talking about. This is only a half bath, so no shower or tub.
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