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Thread: Air Purifiers

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    907
    Quote Originally Posted by zappy View Post
    Have you had a chance to use the Dylos to test the cleaning ability of the Idylis against the IQAir?
    Both produce zero counts @ 0.5 microns when the counter is held in the output stream. However it doesn't mean that there isn't any bypass, given how low the ambient particle counts are in my house (even when I try to shake things to make particles for a test like this). The IQAir HEPA filter doesn't have any gaskets. It's just expanded polystyrene with a tight fit. It bends easily. One hopes it bends *against* the housing when under pressure, to make a seal, and not away. The Idylis HEPA filters are rigid plastic with a thin layer of foam around it. They are a tight fit in the machine -- they jam if they are not inserted just right. They don't feel like they would bend at all under normal pressures. They are held in place by the cover in the front of the machine (it won't close if the filters aren't inserted properly). There's a switch that detects if the cover is in place.

    Other things to consider: the output of the IQAir is redirected horizontally in a circle around the machine by a flat cover. The air that comes out is turbulent. Turbulence is bad because it mixes filtered and dirty air so it takes longer for dust to be brought to the filter. I described in another post how another air purifier I tried was more effective in reducing the particle counts in the room. By removing the top cover on the IQAir, particle counts in the room came down much faster because the air then wasn't turbulent. Also note that IQAir accessories are ridiculously priced, with little pieces of plastic selling for more than half of the price of the already very expensive whole unit. Recommendations for the IQAir by people selling it could be tainted by profit motives (although I respect BE's opinion). The top of the IQAir unit isn't flat so you can't put anything on it (such as a CPAP machine so it would send you filtered air). There's a little animated light that has an annoying hypnotic effect on the ceiling at night -- I had to cover it with black electrical tape. It takes a lot of room. I rarely ever use it anymore -- it's intolerably noisy at the speeds needed for it to be effective. Overall I think the IQAir is not a good value. I'd sell my unit with the set of extra filters (still new in their box) I bought if I could be bothered to find a buyer.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    907
    Quote Originally Posted by zappy View Post
    I've been reading a bunch of reviews of different units. This review is very interesting because the author tests the a high end unit as well as some lower end models using a particle counter. The results are eye opening (to say the least).

    http://www.air-purifier-power.com/iq-air-purifier.html
    I'm skeptical because he strongly recommends a negative ionizer (why?) and UV light gimmicks, and he likes the IQAir. Final scores vary by only small amounts even though the machines are very different in value, noise and performance. I find it interesting to read but I disagree with some arguments and conclusions. I sometimes wonder if it's astroturf.

  3. #29
    What would be a good air purifier for a 11x14 room w/w carpet? I have allergies to dust mites and ragweed. Reasonably priced. Thanks.

  4. #30

    buy air purifier

    will most likely buy one of your purifiers in November when I move due to my wife having some allergy issues.

    The sad thing is however that there is still nothing that can protect us against the industrial pollution of China....

    http://nextpeak.com

  5. #31
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    May 2007
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    Dry as a bone Tucson
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    11x14

    Quote Originally Posted by Fbone View Post
    What would be a good air purifier for a 11x14 room w/w carpet? I have allergies to dust mites and ragweed. Reasonably priced. Thanks.

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  6. #32
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    Mar 2007
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    Myrtle Beach, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fbone View Post
    What would be a good air purifier for a 11x14 room w/w carpet? I have allergies to dust mites and ragweed. Reasonably priced. Thanks.
    You would do better getting a dehumidifier than an air purifier if you have dust mites. Hold the room below 50% RH for 6 months. The dust mites, larvae and eggs will all be gone.

    And when you specified "Reasonably Priced, red flags went up. Don't go cheap. Cheap almost never works well. Some people never learn. Sigh........
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  7. #33

    re

    thanks for this useful information with us http://reviewsondehumidifiers.com/

  8. #34
    We spend almost 90% of our time in the packed environment and come across many indoor air pollutants.The result is irritability,fatigue,headache,mood disorders and other ailments,thus bringing down your efficiency.Air purifier is essential to ensure the effective removal of impurities from the air,which included deadly radioactive particles.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    11
    I've done a lot of research on the Sun Pure SP20-C. I've had one for about six years. I have some independent studies, including one from Hong Kong Poly, that verifies performance. I haven't seen a portable as good because this one deals with VOCs and bioaerosols. Most of your portable units are going to just deal with particulates.

    http://www.ultrasun.com/airpurframes.htm

  10. #36
    A huge problem with standalone air purifiers is the compromise made between the volume of air delivered and noise generated, along with considerations manufacturers make about the dimensions of the machine itself.

    It is true, the IQAir machines have efficient filters. It's too bad that the little things struggle their hearts out to move ~240 cubic feet per minute. Rarely will people run them on max because of the noise. Realistically these air purifiers deliver 115-180 cfm. A filter change reminder on the control panel calculates remaining life as a function of speed x time. For a machine costing over $800, a pressure gauge which would give an honest estimate of remaining filter life is conveniently absent. This is by design, because the in-house produced measly 40 square foot media area HEPA costs $199.99.

    Glancing over at GlobalIndustrial.com, I see a Koch Biomax 24" x 24" x 12" 99.99% (150 sq. ft. media area) for $207.95...... retail. This filter is could literally last 5+ years with proper prefilers. IQAir insists on making these filters themselves on claims of quality. If IQAir has figured out something that Purolator, Flanders, AAF, etc, haven't......then by golly.

    I can appreciate IQAir's strides to inform the public of poor indoor air quality, but the cost of purchasing and operating their product is borderline unconscionable. They are clearly too comfortable filling a slot in the “premium air cleaner” market. The high costs are part of the emotional appeal in their marketing. “After all, what price can you put on the PUREST air?”

    Admittedly, it may not be an easy sell to push a “portable” machine using a 45 lb. behemoth 24” x 24” x 12” HEPA, but it illustrates the compromises being made in terms of relative cost.

    In my experience sampling air particle levels in residential buildings, a typical room would like to have 200-350 cubic feet of air filtered by a portable air purifier to make the significant impact we look for. Certainly, this can cause a dramatic drop in particle levels within the room and commendable improvements in the surrounding area. In this respect, a Honeywell 50250 is in many ways as effective as an IQAir HealthPro.

    Regardless of how efficient the filters are, the particle count will never drop to 0 without manipulating a pressure differential.

    Chasing the lowest possible particle count may not be practical in all cases. A portable air purifier, in my mind, is a machine with a lot of activated carbon/adsorption media. Something more along the lines of an Airpura R600 (18lbs), or an Allerair 5000 DX (27lbs), with big round carbon/potassium permanganate beds. The media in these machines can be purchased in bulk and replaced by the owner.

    Again, comparing this to the IQAir, with its proprietary 5 pound carbon filter costing $99.99... clearly it's a raw deal.

    Air purifiers often are purchased by people with real concerns acting in desperation. Their issues and the width of their pocket book will ultimately decide what model they buy. Without any background or knowledge in indoor air quality, price vouches for quality far better than a specifications sheet. With no objective way of measuring improvements in the air, it becomes a VERY psychological game. These people also don't want to be bothered with recording changes in the pressure gauge or the dirty task of dumping carbon. Not an easy answer.

    I have a Biological Controls M800, tuberculosis isolation room unit, 250-725 variable cfm. With some modifications of my own it is also a very capable gaseous compound machine (15lb rougly 50/50 CTC 60 Carbon and potassium permanganate.) Overpressure in my bedroom along with other measures keeps the particle count at 0 ≥ 0.3m.... smells like a hospital. It's not loud at all, and ironically it uses less electricity than my IQAir I have lent to a relative.

    For sure, portable air purifiers can be great, but people are often their worst enemy.
    Last edited by Doc Roberts; 12-28-2012 at 07:03 PM. Reason: grammar hehe

  11. #37
    DR
    For the average consumer the IQ Air is an excellent product with very high efficiency and good air flow.

    Your comparison of the IQ Air to the Biological Controls M800 is like someone complaining about a Cadillac and comparing it to their Maseratti.

    I like your post except for the part where you say you keep the particle count in your bedroom "at 0>=0.3um." Unless you have a totally sealed bedroom, no supply vents coming from your HVAC system and no activity in the room, there is no way that you could have 0 particle counts in the room at 0.3um. That would exceed the standard for the cleanest "clean room" available. You might check your particle counter.

  12. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by breathe easy View Post
    DR
    For the average consumer the IQ Air is an excellent product with very high efficiency and good air flow.

    Your comparison of the IQ Air to the Biological Controls M800 is like someone complaining about a Cadillac and comparing it to their Maseratti.
    We are not comparing cars here, but if you insist, I contend that the IQAir is more analogous to the Maserati on the basis of relative cost. (i.e., paying for the name, conspicuous consumption)

    The only relevant points are cost (initial and ongoing), filtering efficiency, and the volume of air delivered. There exists a favorable balance of the three.

    We agree that the IQAir is an efficient air filter, but it falls on its face in terms of cost and CFM delivered.

    Case in point, the Novair F2100. Granted, it would not look at home in a designer living room. It does, however, cost the same as an ordinary IQAir Health Pro. ($849)

    This machine will deliver 2000 CFM with far less costly non-proprietary filter replacement. It excels in all three areas, but its appearance and noise make it a negative air machine rather than a portable consumer air purifier. In my mind I feel there could be a machine to meet this balance far more effectively than the IQAir, and indeed there are a few.

    Quote Originally Posted by breathe easy View Post
    I like your post except for the part where you say you keep the particle count in your bedroom "at 0>=0.3um." Unless you have a totally sealed bedroom, no supply vents coming from your HVAC system and no activity in the room, there is no way that you could have 0 particle counts in the room at 0.3um. That would exceed the standard for the cleanest "clean room" available. You might check your particle counter.
    I can't help but feel you are being a bit petty. I don't believe I suggested that my home exceeds the standards of the cleanest "clean rooms" available. The air being pushed in through my supply vents is HEPA filtered, which goes straight into the Biological Controls machine. Of course, when I move around or fold clothes inside this room the particle count will rise accordingly.

    However, when I am not, I will reliably get readings of 0 ≥ 0.3m with my laser particle counter. Aside from the well understood phenomenon of positive air pressure, there is nothing extraordinary about this. Try it sometime.

    A cleanroom wouldn't be a cleanroom without the measures taken to prevent particle counts from exceeding a predetermined level resulting from activity inside.

    My particle counter, a recently calibrated Fluke 983, is working fine.
    Last edited by Doc Roberts; 01-03-2013 at 08:06 PM. Reason: Price on Novair F2100

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