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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5

    Broan Guardian HEPA and ERV

    We are building an ICF house and are planning to install an ERV. I was wondering if anyone has experience with the Broad Guardian GSEH3K that combines both a HEPA filtration system and an ERV.

    Our HVAC Sub seemed indifferent to using this but it is not the brand of ERVs he normally installs which do not include the HEPA Filter.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    349
    I highly recommend the Venmar 4100 HEPA ERV, which is the same as the Broan. Works great for people with allergies, and can be run continuously all year without worrying about moisture issues.
    White Bear Township, Minnesota
    www.summitheating.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,644
    Quote Originally Posted by jdblank View Post
    We are building an ICF house and are planning to install an ERV. I was wondering if anyone has experience with the Broad Guardian GSEH3K that combines both a HEPA filtration system and an ERV.

    Our HVAC Sub seemed indifferent to using this but it is not the brand of ERVs he normally installs which do not include the HEPA Filter.
    What part of the world are located in? How big is the home? How many occupants? What the extent of the sinsitivies? Heating/cooing systems?
    Basement Home? Certainly Broan is a good company with good products. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5
    2,500 Square Feet, Radiant Heating, Passive Cooling (for now), four occupants and in the Pacific Northwest.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,644
    Many of the people in your area use a central exhaust fan with fresh air inlets located in each major room. Is there a tax credit for HRV/ERVs? Basement homes have different needs than crawlspace or slab on grade homes. Installing an ERV requires ducts to distribute the fresh air throughout the the home. If you have open combustion like a fireplace/wood burner, make-up ventilation is another option. Devices like a clothes drier and kitchen hood exhaust need some make-up air. Also climates like Seatle need to be kept warm to avoid high indoor %RH. Good idea to monitor %RH throughout the home especially basements to avoid mold. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Prairie du Sac, WI
    Posts
    22

    Broan Guardian HEPA and ERV

    The unit referenced is rated for 113 cfm outside air @ .4 esp using 224 watts via www.hvi.org website. There is no certified recovery efficiency rating listed. It's actually listed under ventilation fans. Since you have no ductwork (for now) this unit would filter air already in the home. The rating is with a clean filter, and the more you use it, the less air goes thru it, and these filters are costly.
    Oregon provides rebates for approved units meeting minimum certified efficiency standards, and it is not on the list. Unless someone in the home has severe health issues, normally HEPA is overkill. Choose an ERV on its own merits that has a good HVI certified rating, which usually has a one watt to cfm ratio with a rated filter. This will not filter air inside the home, but only air coming in or leaving, to protect the core.
    An ERV is not total humidity control for a home, but it can temper humidity extremes year round for the ventilation air. For a super tight home, use an ERV as a central bath exhaust system.
    The unit in question would probably not recommend that.
    Prioritize your needs and what is important to you, and choose accordingly.

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