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  1. #14
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    May 2007
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    Dry as a bone Tucson
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesus" View Post
    I think your over simplifying the answer. There are more factors and as previously stated you always have a pressure tempreature relationship.
    Oh yeah, I left out the heat.
    Some Talk, Some Do
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  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
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    2,987
    Quote Originally Posted by sktn77a View Post
    Boyle says PV=nRT
    Actually, Boyle said P is inversely proportional to V given a constant temperature.

    Clapeyron should be given credit for the ideal gas law.


    Quote Originally Posted by sktn77a View Post
    Pressure is proportional to Temperature.
    Ahem. In the condenser, pressure and temperature have nearly an exponential relationship due to the fact you're on the refrigerant's saturation curve. Pressure is only approx proportional to temperature in its gas state at a fixed volume.
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail. – Abraham Maslow

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
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    1,070
    Touché


  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
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    3
    So you all are saying that the high-side pressure increase in response to ambient temperature increase has really nothing to do with the refrigeration cycle responding to that as an input? That it is simply the gas in the condenser responding to the temperature increase with a pressure increase? And that the pressure increase is immediate and proportional? Nothing fancy is going on here? The system doesn't even have to be running at all and the pressure will increase if this is the case.

    BTW, sorry for what may seem like a rudimentary question. I'm actually an electrical engineer trying to gain an understanding of refrigeration by attending Internet University.

    Thanks.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    1,561
    Quote Originally Posted by nutohvac View Post
    So you all are saying that the high-side pressure increase in response to ambient temperature increase has really nothing to do with the refrigeration cycle responding to that as an input? That it is simply the gas in the condenser responding to the temperature increase with a pressure increase? And that the pressure increase is immediate and proportional? Nothing fancy is going on here? The system doesn't even have to be running at all and the pressure will increase if this is the case.

    BTW, sorry for what may seem like a rudimentary question. I'm actually an electrical engineer trying to gain an understanding of refrigeration by attending Internet University.

    Thanks.
    If my explanation didn't help you, see if this explanation from the Principles of Refrigeration (Dossat) is any help:

    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17.../Scan10100.jpg

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    1,561
    Here's another explanation for the result of higher ambients:

    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y17.../Scan10098.jpg

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,786

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