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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    10

    New Condenser and old lineset?

    I am replacinf a 22 year old 1.5 ton condensing unit which I venture to guess is a 10 SEER. By moving to a 13 SEER will it be necessary to chnge the lineset's out for larger ones?

    Also, is it mandatory to change the coil aboive the fuurnace out if I put this new condensing unit in?

    Thanks for any help.

    Ken/Atlanta

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,971
    Lineset - maybe. Indoor coil - yes.
    If you're not in the trade, you could be looking at a heap of trouble doing this yourself.
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    10
    Not doing it myself, just getting different opinions on what is required.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    Change the lineset if you can. The additional cost is well worth the insurance/peace of mind against future failure. If it's not practical to change (running under a cement slab/ encased in walls) and it passes the leak test and size requirements, you should be OK (make sure it's thoroughly cleaned out). Being a 1.5 ton unit, the size will probably be fine.

    It's generally not a good idea to pair up a nice, new, outdoor condenser with a grungy old mismatched coil!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,770
    If you want to get your money's worth from a new 13 SEER condenser. Then you'll change out the indoor coil.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    137
    First find out what kind of refrigerant is going to be used. If you are simply replacing the outdoor unit it will use R22. If this is the case don't worry about the lineset. BUT....DON'T just replace the outdoor unit. For a couple of reasons. First you loose all your SEER rating on the new unit if you put it with a old indoor coil. This could also cause damage to the new compressor. Second, R22 equipment is being phased out this year. I would suggest replacing the outdoor unit and coil with R410A refrigerant. Otherwise you will have to replace the coil inside by the end of the year to be sure you can find one that is R22 compatible. If you do go the R410A equipment I would suggest replacing the lineset or at the very least flushing it out because R22 and R410A oils in the lineset will not get along very well

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,770
    Quote Originally Posted by sandpipertech View Post
    Second, R22 equipment is being phased out this year. I would suggest replacing the outdoor unit and coil with R410A refrigerant. Otherwise you will have to replace the coil inside by the end of the year to be sure you can find one that is R22 compatible.
    Not true.

    R410A coils are also rated to work withR22.

    So no problem getting parts/coils for R22 systems. Next year, or the next, or the next, etc.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    137
    ABSOLUTELY disagree. This is completely false. How could they be compatible if R410A oil and R22 oil isn't compatible. They sell flush kits for that very reason. I'm not quite sure what you mean by they are rated to work with R22 coils. This isn't true also because the operating pressures of 410a are much highger than 22 and require different TXV valves/fixed orifices...
    ...also....I do realize that some manufacturers offer coils that are shipped configured with a R22 TXV/orifice that can be changed to R410A. I simply do not believe this is a good way to go based on what I said earlier. I don't see this done very often and the only company around my area that does it is currently on probation with the state

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,770
    Because when you buy a new coil.

    It doesn't have oil in it. So it doesn't matter weather its going to be used on a R22 or R410A system.

    Most manufacturers. Just tested their r22 coils for the higher pressures. And when the coils held, they said they are rated safe for R410A.

    R410A coils aren't made any thicker then R22 coils.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by sandpipertech View Post
    ABSOLUTELY disagree. This is completely false. How could they be compatible if R410A oil and R22 oil isn't compatible. They sell flush kits for that very reason. I'm not quite sure what you mean by they are rated to work with R22 coils. This isn't true also because the operating pressures of 410a are much highger than 22 and require different TXV valves/fixed orifices...
    ...also....I do realize that some manufacturers offer coils that are shipped configured with a R22 TXV/orifice that can be changed to R410A. I simply do not believe this is a good way to go based on what I said earlier. I don't see this done very often and the only company around my area that does it is currently on probation with the state
    All of the current Aspen coils seem to be designed for both R410A and R22. One size smaller orifice spec'd for R410A.

    If there is a reason that any R410-rated coil wouldn't work with R-22 (with the proper orifice or TXV) I would like to hear the explanation.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,770
    No reason what so ever.
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    137
    Johnz,
    Let me try an explain it again. I guess I'm no good at typing what I wanna say. Yes. If you purchase a coil you can convert that coil to work with 22 or 410. The ONLY thing that I am saying is I would not recommend converting it to 410 once its been run using 22. Or vice versa. I've seen too many customers replace their indoor coil with a 22 txv/orifice just to get by. Then replace their outdoor unit in 410a and convert their coils txv or orifice to match. And then their compressor craps out because the coil had 22 oil residue that didn't work with the oils in 410a. I'm simply saying. Choose a refrigerant and stick with it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    167
    [QUOTE=sandpipertech;3307422]Johnz,
    Let me try an explain it again. I guess I'm no good at typing what I wanna say. Yes. If you purchase a coil you can convert that coil to work with 22 or 410. The ONLY thing that I am saying is I would not recommend converting it to 410 once its been run using 22. Or vice versa. I've seen too many customers replace their indoor coil with a 22 txv/orifice just to get by. Then replace their outdoor unit in 410a and convert their coils txv or orifice to match. And then their compressor craps out because the coil had 22 oil residue that didn't work with the oils in 410a. I'm simply saying. Choose a refrigerant and stick with it.[/QUOT

    op was asking about lineset and indoor coil.

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