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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Posts
    11

    Deciding between Trane and Rheem HP

    We received two quotes today from contractors both of whom I'm comfortable with. One quoted a Trane and the other a Rheem.

    Both systems appear to qualify for the federal tax credit and here are the details.

    Trane
    TUD60R9V 60,000 btu variable speed furnace 80%
    4TWX5024A1 Heat Pump 2 ton Single Stage 15 SEER
    4TXCB032BC3HCA 32,000 btu coil
    Honeywell IAQ Thermostat

    Rheem
    80% 2 stage Furnace ECM2+ motor
    RPPL Heat Pump 2 ton Two Stage 16 SEER (he listed as RPPL but I don't see this on the Rheem website. RPRL is the 16 SEER unit). He quoted me a RPPL 14 SEER and and a 16 SEER so I think he didn't change the pre-fix.
    Dual Fuel Evaporator Coil
    White Rodgers 1F951277 Thermostat

    Obviously the Rheem quote is not as detailed with model numbers as the Trane quote.

    Things I like about the Trane system are 1)it's a Trane and 2) IAQ Thermostat 3) better warranty 10/10 versus 10/5

    Things I like about the Rheem system are 1)HP is 1 extra SEER and 2 stage 2) it is considerably less money than the Trane system 3)it's a Rheem as our 23 year old system is a Ruud

    So questions: is the White Rodgers tstat the equivalent of the IAQ tstat or should I insist on the IAQ? Does the 2 stage and extra SEER make much difference in the HP?

    I'm in the Atlanta area and this is for the second floor system. Probably about 900-1000 square feet upstairs.

    Ryles

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,608
    Those are 2 fine heat pump systems. Either one should serve you well.

    The RPPL is 14 SEER and RPRL is the higher efficiency 2 stage. The RPRL can reach up to 17 SEER depending upon which furnace. It also qualifies for the tax credit.

    Haven't used that W-R stat but from the reliability problems of the version they use with the Modulating furnace, I'd prefer the IAQ. You might ask the Rheem dealer if he'll use it instead and be sure both dealers plan to hook up the dehumidify feature of the variable speed blower.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    i do have a preference of those 2 brands, but;

    concentrate on finding a reputable contractor, use the brand that they prefer

    if you find a reputable contractor that installs all brands of equipment, use the Trane

    the TRANE 20i combination (communicating system) is one of my favorite systems out of all equipment



    .

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    The RPPL is a 14 SEER unit and does not appear to qualify (on the Rheem site) for the tax credit. The RPRL is the much more expensive 16 SEER unit and, when matched with the RCFM (and possibly RCFN) coil, should qualify for the credit. I've never heard of a "dual fuel" Rheem coil so make sure it is a Rheem coil and that the combination of HP, coil and furnace is listed as qualifying for the tax credit on the Rheem site.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Area 51
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by classical View Post
    You may have heard a local contractor offering the moon, is offering big discounts on systems, 20 inches of insulation blown in, tax credits and others things. If in Houston you blow in 20" you will be causing serious problems with your house and to put that much on top is even worse. Also most of the equipment match ups for the tax credit are very poor options for the Houston climate, the evap. coils are too large and the blowers are too big. They will deliver very poor latent capacity and will result in higher bills and poor comfort.

    I found this on another thread and this guy makes good sense, just because of a tax credit your letting the government tell you which is the best application for your home, do you really want to do that? It's very possible that a system that does not meet the requirements of the tax credit "may" be a better application for your particular home. I personally would look beyond just the tax credit with an open mind to an application that best fits your home needs, not Government tax credit requirements.

    Check out this link if your climate is about the same as Houston, Tx.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=286952

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparks Air View Post
    I found this on another thread and this guy makes good sense, just because of a tax credit your letting the government tell you which is the best application for your home, do you really want to do that? It's very possible that a system that does not meet the requirements of the tax credit "may" be a better application for your particular home. I personally would look beyond just the tax credit with an open mind to an application that best fits your home needs, not Government tax credit requirements.
    Absolutely true, Sparks! In this case, the higher SEER Rheem unit is also a 2 stage unit while the lower SEER unit is a single stage unit. So the the more efficient one should also help take out some of that humidity by running on first stage for longer.

    Also, to the OP, if you go for the Rheem "prestige" series 2 stage 80% furnace (RGPR/RGLR) with the RPRL HP (or the RPPL with the JEZ suffix), you get a 10 year replacement warranty on the furnace and heatpump.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    My personal preference is the Rheem over the Trane.
    Why, do you ask?
    Because of repair costs down the road.
    I have yet seen the Trane unit that did not cost twice as much to repair than a Rheem, or just about any other brand really.
    As far as direct applicability, go with the professional contractor who has a good reputation, and listen to his recommendations. He will be able to explain which, if either, one of the systems will work best for your home.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryles View Post
    Both systems appear to qualify for the federal tax credit and here are the details.

    Trane
    TUD60R9V 60,000 btu variable speed furnace 80%
    4TWX5024A1 Heat Pump 2 ton Single Stage 15 SEER
    4TXCB032BC3HCA 32,000 btu coil
    Not sure about the 32,000 btu coil.
    That system is AHRI Reference# 3206202.
    25,000 btu cooling, 15 SEER, 12.5 EER, 8.5 HSPF, 22,600 btu heating at 47F.
    It does indeed qualify for the Fed Tax Rebate.

    Good luck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Posts
    11

    Decided

    Decided to go with the Trane system. I had the Rheem installer quote the Trane system and it is now slightly less expensive than the Rheem 16 SEER 2 stage unit. Of course the Trane is 15 SEER single stage.

    He is quoting a Trane thermostat as apparently Trane upgrades the warranty if you use their thermostat instead of an aftermarket unit.

    Should I stay with the Trane thermostat or insist on the Honeywell IAQ?

    Ryles

    Oh yeah, I read the Houston area post but I don't see why I should go with a lesser efficient unit, lose the tax credit, and thus pay more money for a less efficient unit when the systems quoted actually fit my needs very well.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,608
    The IAQ will work with the dehumidify on demand capability of the furnace and also it will stage the gas backup heat.

    The Trane 802 stat is the Vision Pro 8320. It doesn't do dehumidify on demand, nor will it do staging on the gas. You'd have to use the timer in the furnace which is a poor way to control such a nice furnace. The IAQ has a 5 year warranty and has been pretty reliable.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    TEXAS
    Posts
    1,701
    Quote Originally Posted by stonewallred View Post
    My personal preference is the Rheem over the Trane.
    Why, do you ask?
    Because of repair costs down the road.
    I have yet seen the Trane unit that did not cost twice as much to repair than a Rheem, or just about any other brand really.
    As far as direct applicability, go with the professional contractor who has a good reputation, and listen to his recommendations. He will be able to explain which, if either, one of the systems will work best for your home.
    if labor is a repair cost then the rheem is more expensive. i can change a trane condenser fan motor in about half the time it takes to change the rheem motor. that is, if i have the rheem motor on the truck and the trane motor is at the supply house.
    "When the people find they can vote themselves money,that will herald the end of the republic" - Benjamin Franklin

    "Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force;like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action"- George Washington

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    61
    I would go with the Trane unit to be honest. My company deals quite a bit with Rheem and they just recently decided to stop installing Rheem heat pumps because of some issues they are having. Quite a few miscellaneous problems. One of the most occurring problems is with the condenser fan motor failing.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by smittyii View Post
    if labor is a repair cost then the rheem is more expensive. i can change a trane condenser fan motor in about half the time it takes to change the rheem motor. that is, if i have the rheem motor on the truck and the trane motor is at the supply house.
    All in the experience,lol. I worked when I first started for one of the biggest companies around and all they installed were Rheems and Thermoprides. Since I worked for this company 3 times for almost ten years total time, I am familiar with Rheems and can service them with minimum problems. Now a Trane, those take me a lot more time, because I don't know where every screw, tab and tricky little area is.
    Last edited by stonewallred; 05-15-2009 at 02:48 AM. Reason: spelling/grammar

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