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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,321
    Gill 2-stage is the best option for Houston but may not be the answer you are looking for. The most important thing is go with a variable speed furnace.

    If you have a home built in 1999 in Houston and you have 8-tons on 3200 sq.ft. unless you have a great deal of western glass you are oversized.

    The main thing you need in Houston is a tight duct system, sufficient return air capacity and proper attic insulation and ventilation, there are many companies that are getting into attic insulation now and they go overboard and create more problems than they cure.

    First start with a properly performed load calculation not one performed to prove out the contractors equipment choice.

    Depending on the layout of your home you may be an excellent choice for a single zoned system instead of two systems.

    Remember the value of a system is in the install and the thought that goes into the design of that system not hyperbole or low price.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,321
    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    There are two companies I have worked with as a customer, that serve the West Houston area. One is a large company named Absolute Comfort. Another is a one man business called Addicks Air and Heat. There is also a guy on this board named Al Fowler (Aire-Serv of W. Houston?) who seems to have a lot of knowledge based on his posts.

    I am glad I got a 2-stage system but if money were tighter would be fine with one of the higher efficiency 1-stage systems. In any case would get a variable speed air handler to enable some of the better approaches to humidity control.

    Hope this helps -- Pstu
    OK now I understand a few things!

    I am no longer AireServ fired them about 6-months back!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    R.O.T.
    Posts
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by gil_bo View Post
    another question what r is done to determine a load calculation
    I have a computer program to run heat loads with. Any good contractor should be able to run a load on yer house.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by classical View Post
    Gill 2-stage is the best option for Houston but may not be the answer you are looking for. The most important thing is go with a variable speed furnace.

    If you have a home built in 1999 in Houston and you have 8-tons on 3200 sq.ft. unless you have a great deal of western glass you are oversized.

    The main thing you need in Houston is a tight duct system, sufficient return air capacity and proper attic insulation and ventilation, there are many companies that are getting into attic insulation now and they go overboard and create more problems than they cure.

    First start with a properly performed load calculation not one performed to prove out the contractors equipment choice.

    Depending on the layout of your home you may be an excellent choice for a single zoned system instead of two systems.

    Remember the value of a system is in the install and the thought that goes into the design of that system not hyperbole or low price.

    my neighborhood unfortunately hasnt been around long enough, to have trees big enough for aid in shading, my house faces south, with a 2 story entry,and bcuz of that alot of heat comes through the entryway glass above the door and 31 windows

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Gil_bo, if you are at all considering solar screens for shading they are inexpensive and could affect sizing of your replacement AC. They were quite effective helping a room in my house which got too warm due to east windows. If you are going to do it, then do it before your final load calc, rather than after. Same goes for other energy improvements you plan to make.

    It is east and west exposure which is worst case for windows. If it were up to me the major window area would be north and south. I wouldn't feel too bad about your south orientation, as summer comes the sun will be more and more indirect on those windows. In the winter some argue that you benefit from solar heating via the lower sun.

    Of the three AC companies I mentioned, Classical/Al/ex-AirServe is likely to have the most skilled technician. You might ask him to inspect your house and give some advice. Seeing as it *might* steer you toward the right AC sizing, that consulting should be worth a pretty penny to you.

    Best of luck -- Pstu

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,321
    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    Gil_bo, if you are at all considering solar screens for shading they are inexpensive and could affect sizing of your replacement AC. They were quite effective helping a room in my house which got too warm due to east windows. If you are going to do it, then do it before your final load calc, rather than after. Same goes for other energy improvements you plan to make.

    It is east and west exposure which is worst case for windows. If it were up to me the major window area would be north and south. I wouldn't feel too bad about your south orientation, as summer comes the sun will be more and more indirect on those windows. In the winter some argue that you benefit from solar heating via the lower sun.

    Of the three AC companies I mentioned, Classical/Al/ex-AirServe is likely to have the most skilled technician. You might ask him to inspect your house and give some advice. Seeing as it *might* steer you toward the right AC sizing, that consulting should be worth a pretty penny to you.

    Best of luck -- Pstu
    You are absolutely correct about the declination of the windows and solar screen, you need to check with your HOA about the screen. There are other options as well like Awnings or other types of overhangs.

    You best option always is thoughtful consideration of what can first be done to improve the homes envelope in conjunction with the HVAC. Do you have sufficient attic ventilation, are your soffit vents open and clear. I cannot tell you how many times that I have pulled soffit vent covers off to find the opening either block, not cut out or only partially cut out. Do you have ridge vents or turbines, do you have a lot of can lights. These are the things you need to consider so you have the best envelope to install that new A/C in.

    You may have heard a local contractor offering the moon, is offering big discounts on systems, 20 inches of insulation blown in, tax credits and others things. If in Houston you blow in 20" you will be causing serious problems with your house and to put that much on top is even worse. Also most of the equipment match ups for the tax credit are very poor options for the Houston climate, the evap. coils are too large and the blowers are too big. They will deliver very poor latent capacity and will result in higher bills and poor comfort.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    Gil_bo, if you are at all considering solar screens for shading they are inexpensive and could affect sizing of your replacement AC. They were quite effective helping a room in my house which got too warm due to east windows. If you are going to do it, then do it before your final load calc, rather than after. Same goes for other energy improvements you plan to make.

    It is east and west exposure which is worst case for windows. If it were up to me the major window area would be north and south. I wouldn't feel too bad about your south orientation, as summer comes the sun will be more and more indirect on those windows. In the winter some argue that you benefit from solar heating via the lower sun.

    Of the three AC companies I mentioned, Classical/Al/ex-AirServe is likely to have the most skilled technician. You might ask him to inspect your house and give some advice. Seeing as it *might* steer you toward the right AC sizing, that consulting should be worth a pretty penny to you.

    Best of luck -- Pstu
    i already hve solar screen on the west side windows

    thks, i will give them a call

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by classical View Post
    You are absolutely correct about the declination of the windows and solar screen, you need to check with your HOA about the screen. There are other options as well like Awnings or other types of overhangs.

    You best option always is thoughtful consideration of what can first be done to improve the homes envelope in conjunction with the HVAC. Do you have sufficient attic ventilation, are your soffit vents open and clear. I cannot tell you how many times that I have pulled soffit vent covers off to find the opening either block, not cut out or only partially cut out. Do you have ridge vents or turbines, do you have a lot of can lights. These are the things you need to consider so you have the best envelope to install that new A/C in.

    You may have heard a local contractor offering the moon, is offering big discounts on systems, 20 inches of insulation blown in, tax credits and others things. If in Houston you blow in 20" you will be causing serious problems with your house and to put that much on top is even worse. Also most of the equipment match ups for the tax credit are very poor options for the Houston climate, the evap. coils are too large and the blowers are too big. They will deliver very poor latent capacity and will result in higher bills and poor comfort.

    yea we added ridge vents a couple yrs ago, luckily i have soffit vents that run continously, all the way around the house. as far as can lights only 4 can lights on the second floor

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    6,321
    Quote Originally Posted by gil_bo View Post
    yea we added ridge vents a couple yrs ago, luckily i have soffit vents that run continously, all the way around the house. as far as can lights only 4 can lights on the second floor
    Definitely sounds like 8-tons on 3200 sq.ft. is too much A/C.

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