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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    6,501
    [QUOTE=pmeunier;3224782]I remember reading some studies that said dry mucous membranes (sinuses) makes one more vulnerable to infection. It's not hard to find similar statements from relatively trustworthy sources:

    "The most common cold-causing viruses survive better when humidity is low -- the colder months of the year. Cold weather also may make the nasal passages' lining drier and more vulnerable to viral infection. "

    That sir is correct
    You sure are cocky for a starving pilgrim.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    103
    I have a humidifier on my hvac system. The problem I see is that while the humidistat may read 40% on the air returning from the rest of the house, the humidity level directly after the humidifier (which is directly after the humidistat) must be much higher than 40%. That's where I worry about mold forming. Any thoughts?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
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    Eastern PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziocarl View Post
    I have a humidifier on my hvac system. The problem I see is that while the humidistat may read 40% on the air returning from the rest of the house, the humidity level directly after the humidifier (which is directly after the humidistat) must be much higher than 40%. That's where I worry about mold forming. Any thoughts?
    The temperature of the ductin would have to reach the dewpoint of the humidity level from the humidifier in order to condense into a liquid on the surface of the ducting before mold growth would occur. I've never seen such an issue.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    search a guy called Dr.Jan Sundell, quite a distinguished guy on air quality especially for kids

    he is not a humidifier fan
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
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    68,943
    Personally, I prefer controlling winter humidity levels with a pot of simmering water with spices in it on my electric stove. This is not an automatic system, of course, but it sure does make the house comfy and smell nice.

    That said, the benefits of a well maintained central humidifier far outweigh the health risks of humidifiers that are completely neglected.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  6. #19
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    Nov 2000
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    Eastern PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carnak View Post
    search a guy called Dr.Jan Sundell, quite a distinguished guy on air quality especially for kids

    he is not a humidifier fan
    OK, just looked this guy up. Sounds like my kind of guy with his thoughts that humans are basically misplaced in this world and what keeps us comfy outside of the savannah of Southern Sudan is also what is causing us to become ill. I agree.

    However, most of this doc's studies have to do with common dwelling buildings such as work places, tenement housing etc. Having a discussion about the IAQ of an individual home has little to do with this guys studies and conclusions.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by RoBoTeq View Post
    The temperature of the ductin would have to reach the dewpoint of the humidity level from the humidifier in order to condense into a liquid on the surface of the ducting before mold growth would occur. I've never seen such an issue.

    Well the humidifier is on the return air side so in the winter, the air can get down to the low 60's at night. Let's say the outdoor temp is in the 40's, the humidistat might call for 45% relative humidity. Of course the humidifier will continue to run until the humidified air travels through the whole house and back to the humidistat.

    I'm no expert. I don't know the math. Could that situation result in a higher humdity level in the space right after the humdifier. Say like 60%?

    Please explain.

  8. #21
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    Nov 2000
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    Eastern PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziocarl View Post
    Well the humidifier is on the return air side so in the winter, the air can get down to the low 60's at night. Let's say the outdoor temp is in the 40's, the humidistat might call for 45% relative humidity. Of course the humidifier will continue to run until the humidified air travels through the whole house and back to the humidistat.

    I'm no expert. I don't know the math. Could that situation result in a higher humdity level in the space right after the humdifier. Say like 60%?

    Please explain.
    Where is this unit located? If it is in an attic or other unconditioned space, the return and humidifier components should be properly insulated to prevent outdoor ambient from affecting the air in the duct that much.

    Furnaces don't even like having below 50 degree air entering them.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Nope. This is a two zone setup. I have a unit in the attic with no humdifier and one in the basement with a humdifier. At night the temp goes down into the low 60's in the downstairs zone. What's the point of a 2 zone system if I have to keep the heat up in the zone I'm not in over night?

    So again, in this scenario, why wouldn't the air right after the humidifier and before the coils not be higher than 45% relative humidity.

    I really want to know.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5
    Which makes more sense efficiency and cost wise. A Furnace with a heat pump or Furnace with a Compressor only. I had water damage at my house in Hyannis, the place is now down to studs and I am having a contractor take out the old and put in the 'new', and adding A/C.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    103
    Quote Originally Posted by Ziocarl View Post
    Nope. This is a two zone setup. I have a unit in the attic with no humdifier and one in the basement with a humdifier. At night the temp goes down into the low 60's in the downstairs zone. What's the point of a 2 zone system if I have to keep the heat up in the zone I'm not in over night?

    So again, in this scenario, why wouldn't the air right after the humidifier and before the coils not be higher than 45% relative humidity.

    I really want to know.
    Guess no one knows?

  12. #25
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    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
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    What I don't know is what it is you are trying to get at. Your question has been answered. Now you are changing the parameters to something that I do not understand what you are trying to say.

    There will be no condensation of moisture on the inside of your ducting under the scenario that has been put forth. I thought that was what you wanted to know.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  13. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by RoBoTeq View Post
    What I don't know is what it is you are trying to get at. Your question has been answered. Now you are changing the parameters to something that I do not understand what you are trying to say.

    There will be no condensation of moisture on the inside of your ducting under the scenario that has been put forth. I thought that was what you wanted to know.
    You said that the temperature of the duct would have to reach dewpoint, to which I responded that it got into the low 60's. To that, you ask more question which I answered. I don't see the problem. You asked, I supplied. I just honestly wanted to know the answer to my original question which you really couldn't have answered without the additional info I provided. I don't know these calculations. That's why I'm asking for an answer. That's what these forums are for.

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