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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448

    Worthington Chiller

    1966 Worthington with a V2 Worthington 4 head 8 cylinder compressor. Converted from water cooled to air cooled 20 years ago. Still runs like a champ. Had leak issues and I found a couple but then the one in a place I have never seen. I will post pics when I am done with it in a day or so. Anyhow the leak, on the side of the compressor there is a large plate with 10 or 12 5/8" bolts in it and it has the oil sight glass and then a few weirdly placed bolts. I got the nitro up to 200 psig and when going over it with soap I noticed an oil vapor coming out of an allen head "plug", only the allen head had a hole in it. I was just about to plug this hole with a new "plug" when I noticed that this hole seemed a little too perfect. I called the local compressor re builder and much to my surprise this was and atmosphere port for the capacity control module inside and that it contains a bellows that will wear out over time and leak. Even more surprised they had one in stock (pricey little thing). I again will post pics of all of this when I am done.
    "It's always controls"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Motel 6.5
    Posts
    148
    I wasn't even born with that was started. Hope it keeps running.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448
    Me either. I was negative 10.
    "It's always controls"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Dixiana, AL
    Posts
    2,609
    I was (I was 6). There was still a trainload of those things around when I first went into the field, so I got to play with several of them. It's my opinion that when they quit makin' Worthington recips, we lost a jewel. Kinda' like the old Trane double-enders - not real efficient, but easy enough to service, and hard to tear up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448

    Ok Here are the head pics, More to follow.

    worthHead.jpg

    WorthHead2.jpg
    The allen head that is at an angle ( I scraped the paint off so it looks black in the pic) is the port where the leak is.
    "It's always controls"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by klove View Post
    I was (I was 6). There was still a trainload of those things around when I first went into the field, so I got to play with several of them. It's my opinion that when they quit makin' Worthington recips, we lost a jewel. Kinda' like the old Trane double-enders - not real efficient, but easy enough to service, and hard to tear up.
    Not much complicated about them, that is for sure. The only call we normally get (for the chiller anyway) is during the switch over weather, it is a 2 pipe system with the original pneumatics still in tact. Did replace the condenser fan motor a couple years ago, belt drive for 2 fans.
    "It's always controls"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    555
    Great to see a worthington is still out there running, haven't seen one since way back in my apprentice days- when I walked uphill both ways to school five miles in deep snow blah blah blah....

    Do you have a pic of the entire compressor?

    Ever work on one of those old chrysler hermetic vertical compressors that looked a bit like a small barrell?
    GO DAWGS!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC9900 View Post
    Great to see a worthington is still out there running, haven't seen one since way back in my apprentice days- when I walked uphill both ways to school five miles in deep snow blah blah blah....

    Do you have a pic of the entire compressor?

    Ever work on one of those old chrysler hermetic vertical compressors that looked a bit like a small barrell?
    Yeah I will post some more as I go through the repair.

    It has been a while since I worked on those Chryslers, had them at the AF base.
    "It's always controls"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    341
    I used to work for a Worthigton dealer back in the day.

    If I am not mistaken we used to use the port that you are talking about to hook to a pneumatic receiver controller for external capacity control.(I am sure that is no real help in this case but may be of interest)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    349
    It's probably a good thing you didn't plug it. It would build pressure once plugged and load up and not unload. I had a Trane F that someone plugged and couldn't get it to unload. Carrier 5F, Trane F and a few others had this
    port on them for a pneumatic control signal for capacity control. It was actually handy for testing purposes. Put a fitting in and a squeeze bulb with a guage and load and unload at will! Don't have to get the big wrenches out and mess with the suction service valve.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    243
    As I recall, triggerhappy is not mistaken. These compressors operated much like the big iron Trane (Mod E & F) and could incorporate pneumatic unloading using that port. Otherwise it was left open to the atmosphere.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
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    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by triggerhappy View Post
    I used to work for a Worthigton dealer back in the day.

    If I am not mistaken we used to use the port that you are talking about to hook to a pneumatic receiver controller for external capacity control.(I am sure that is no real help in this case but may be of interest)
    That is really cool. Load unload based on actual load, what a concept. Pneumatics, by far the most dependable accurate controls to date, dang hacks and ill maintenance ruined them.
    "It's always controls"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,448
    Today I pulled off the plate and while cleaning the inside gasket surface on the manifold I thought I knocked a piece of gasket material in the sump, even though I was using plastic wrap to prevent it from getting in there. I then shined my light in and found a piece of a broken connecting rod cap in the oil sump. Now I get to replace the piston, connecting rod and cylinder sleeve. Lucky me, I always get the fun stuff, actually I am kinda having fun with this one. I will post some pics a little later, I have to sort them out after I take em off my cell.
    "It's always controls"

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