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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Kansas City Metro Area
    Posts
    38

    Crimp on connectors cooking off... hmmm...

    Due to the glorious recession I've been doing more kitchen service work.

    So I'm running into failed crimp connectors or rather failed wire at connector on steam tables and other resistance heat element controls and the element themselves.

    Other than high temp crimp connectors what other good practices need to be done or is this just the reality of kitchen equipment?

    Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    159
    Don't know if 'kitchen environment effects are an added factor -but in general all power crimps (especially replacement after overheating), is getting back to clean metal. I'll straighten the twist out and separate the strands to get a fine wire brush in there and a wipe clean, then re-twist prior to crimping.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,367
    solder the wire to the connector, takes a few mins but will help prevent call-backs. Dont forget to use ceramic wire nuts if you have to splice wires. Thanks to the recession I started working on cooking equipment. Damn, I had it easy before.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,029
    i have a few ovens with grill tops i work on and although i don't get the High Temp Terminal ends i just get the uninsulated ones and never had a problem, also i use stainless steal nuts and bolts (if its a ring terminal)

    these grill tops are around 600 deg F

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    648
    Quote Originally Posted by mixsit View Post
    Don't know if 'kitchen environment effects are an added factor -but in general all power crimps (especially replacement after overheating), is getting back to clean metal. I'll straighten the twist out and separate the strands to get a fine wire brush in there and a wipe clean, then re-twist prior to crimping.
    Second that. If you can not strip to clean, replace the wire. Nickel.
    "Fighting Ignorance since 1973 (It’s taking longer than we thought)." The Straight Dope.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada-in the Banana Belt!!
    Posts
    211
    I 2nd that on the high temp nickel plate wire, and I believe there are non insulated crimp on connectors that are nickel as well and are made for high temp. I know my boss always kept a supply of them on our trucks for high temp stuff...I just liked them cuz they are nice and shiny..lol...jk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    las vegas
    Posts
    1,505
    had to go to the shop this pm to find some obsolete parts & found an
    un opened roll of 250 ft. # 12 high temp wire & a metal terminal box full of shiney
    terminals.. almost makes me want to do the hot side again.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    111
    Johnstone sells a nice kit just for high temp
    If your not part of the solution, You must be part of the problem

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,594
    You need an Ideal CrimpMaster, with the non-insulated crimp jaws, also I second soldering. Fluxed, used StayBrite on the wire, crimped, fluxed and hit with a tiny bit of StayBrite. I used a Butane solder iron, since you can use them anywere. They are nice for Board repair, as they don't generate static like the AC Irons do.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Frozen in UpState NY
    Posts
    59
    I've found most of the burnt off wires I have encountred are caused by a loose connect somewhere else in the circut.drawing high amps.
    make sure everythings tight and in good condition, if it looks iffy repair it with Hi-Temp terminations and Hi-Temp wire if it needs replacing

    End of call backs for me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Yorkshire England
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    You need an Ideal CrimpMaster, with the non-insulated crimp jaws, also I second soldering. Fluxed, used StayBrite on the wire, crimped, fluxed and hit with a tiny bit of StayBrite. I used a Butane solder iron, since you can use them anywere. They are nice for Board repair, as they don't generate static like the AC Irons do.
    Would that crimper be the one that crimps the uninsulated type that makes both sides roll into the middle of the wire? You know the type you see on factory made tail ends.

    The one I use is a standard ratchet crimper that has 3 sizes on the jaws and won't crimp that sort of crimp.

    I always find that the female spade connection is never tight and has to be squashed down prior to shoving it on the male spade, it lasts for a bit longer.
    Last edited by chilliwilly; 12-15-2009 at 08:10 PM. Reason: missing text
    Martyn

    50 & 60 hz but 100's worse

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Winter Haven, FL
    Posts
    4,367
    When I crimp the wires I use the inside of my linemans pliers. Its not pretty as it is flat, but the connector stays attached to the wire.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Over the river and through the woods
    Posts
    116

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Harper View Post
    When I crimp the wires I use the inside of my linemans pliers. Its not pretty as it is flat, but the connector stays attached to the wire.
    My all time favorite tool.....

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