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  1. #1

    Conflicting Opinions

    I've had two different 'heating specialists' give me a bid on a ductless heat pump, both from a list of recommended contractors from our water and light department. They both came up with the same locations for the two heads but one recommended an 18 in one room and a 12 in the other and the other recommended a 12 and 12. No one really does that load test so I just have to figure out which one is right. I have a 1400 sq. ft. home and I live in Oregon. Our winters lows averages are usually in the thirties but can drop lower. I know there is so much more involved but can anyone guide me in the right direction?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    4,264
    Call and discuss with the two your concerns. Too often customers are concerned about stepping on toes or hurting feelings. I'm sure they are both professionals and won't mind validating their choices. Or, for $49 you can click on HVAC Calc at the top of this page and purchase the program and do the load study yourself. It will give you an idea of who is in the ballpark.
    There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action....Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Thank you, I never even saw that up there. Is it easy enough that I can figure out how to do it myself? I'm assuming I will need the square footage of the rooms but is there more?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,168
    Room size.
    Direction orientation.
    Wall insulation.
    Floor and ceiling insulation.
    Window sizes, etc.


    It will have screens for you to enter the info in.
    And I think it comes with instructions.

    If you have questions.
    Don, has good customer service.

    He is the original creator of this board.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,251
    Don't forget to ask about the unit's heating capacity at your normal winter temps. Several brands of mini-splits use variable speed compressors to allow for proper summer operation and this also allows the units to be sized for heating capacity. So if you do the heatload, look at your heating requirements.
    "You do not merely want to be considered just the best of the best. You want to be considered the only ones who do what you do.".... Jerry Garcia
    "You just have to decide if you're a Tigger or an Eeyore,..I think you know where I stand on the great Tigger/Eeyore debate." Prof. Randy Pausch

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    1,633
    Quote Originally Posted by macdweller View Post
    I've had two different 'heating specialists' give me a bid on a ductless heat pump, both from a list of recommended contractors from our water and light department. They both came up with the same locations for the two heads but one recommended an 18 in one room and a 12 in the other and the other recommended a 12 and 12. No one really does that load test so I just have to figure out which one is right. I have a 1400 sq. ft. home and I live in Oregon. Our winters lows averages are usually in the thirties but can drop lower. I know there is so much more involved but can anyone guide me in the right direction?
    Funny thing is, if you can do a load calc why cant the ecompany who is bidding on the work. Be careful and get as many estimates as possible.
    Victor

  7. #7
    Thanks everyone I will give it a go.

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