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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
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    Guayaquil EC
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    10,487

    We Gotta Get a Corned Beef Thread Goin' Here...

    St. Patrick's Day is Tuesday and I'm sitting here dreaming about the old days back in New England with a traditional gray corned beef and cabbage boiled dinner.

    Gray??? you say? Well some actually say it's somewhat brownish gray in color. It's because the corned beef I know growing up contained no nitrates....which are preservatives and is what turns your typical brisket red.

    It seems as soon as you travel a bit south of the Boston area, all corned beef suddenly goes red. Now that I'm in Florida, I have to resort to corning it myself. Time's a little short to start one for St. Pat's because it takes a least three day to cure in the brine, but maybe I'll be inspired to do it real soon.

    I use a bottom round cut rather than the brisket. It's so much more tender and more flavorful.....and where the heck do you find an uncured brisket right now anyway?

    Any other New Englanders out there who like it gray?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    909
    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    St. Patrick's Day is Tuesday and I'm sitting here dreaming about the old days back in New England with a traditional gray corned beef and cabbage boiled dinner.

    Gray??? you say? Well some actually say it's somewhat brownish gray in color. It's because the corned beef I know growing up contained no nitrates....which are preservatives and is what turns your typical brisket red.

    It seems as soon as you travel a bit south of the Boston area, all corned beef suddenly goes red. Now that I'm in Florida, I have to resort to corning it myself. Time's a little short to start one for St. Pat's because it takes a least three day to cure in the brine, but maybe I'll be inspired to do it real soon.

    I use a bottom round cut rather than the brisket. It's so much more tender and more flavorful.....and where the heck do you find an uncured brisket right now anyway?

    Any other New Englanders out there who like it gray?
    Can't help you there. Where I'm at, there aint no such thing as corned beef. The closest thing we have to Boston, is a Boston Butt, which I actually have on the smoker right now! Um Um good if you got the right sauce! Which I do!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,461
    Have not made one yet but I love a good Ruben. I am trying to figure what I am going to use in my brine. How do you do yours?
    "It's always controls"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    USA
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    1,461
    OH yeah where you get brisket void the preservatives. I am not sure my local meat market uses em or not.
    "It's always controls"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
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    This is a copy of a recipe that is just like what I do (I like the Bottom Round though):

    Traditional, pink-colored corned beef is chock-full of nitrates and nitrites. Grey corned beef may not look as appetizing, but it's alot healthier, and it's actually pretty easy to make your own. The thing you need most of is time.

    8 cups water
    1 1/4 cup salt
    3 Tbsp white sugar
    4 heaping Tbsp pickling spices
    6 whole peppercorns (any color)
    8 bay leaves
    2 cloves of fresh garlic, minced

    1 6-pound beef brisket or bottom round roast (you can use two 3-pound
    pieces if that's easier to store in your fridge).

    First, brine the meat:

    Bring the water to a boil. Add the salt and sugar, and stir until they dissolve completely. Then turn off the heat and add the pickling spices and peppercorns. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

    Rinse the meat in cool water, pat dry with paper towels, and place in a large zip-top bag (large enough to hold the meat and the brine). You might want to double bag it, and place it in a large glass dish in case of leaks. If you can't find bags large enough, you can use a large, deep non-metallic casserole dish by itself.

    the garlic and bay leaves to the cooled brine, stir, and then pour it over the beef in the bag. Close the top of the bag(s), place a heavy can or a heavy plate on top of the meat to keep it submerged in the brine, and put the whole thing into your fridge. If you're not using bags, then cover the casserole dish with a piece of plastic wrap large enough to hang well over the sides. Then place a plate AND a heavy can on top of that, to keep the meat submerged.

    Refrigerate for 15 to 18 days -- yes, really. That long. Turn the meat once a day (I just lift the whole bag up and turn it over), replacing the weight on top to make sure the meat stays all the way in the brine.

    To cook the beef, you'll need:

    3 Tbsp pickling spices
    6 bay leaves
    Potatoes, carrots, parnsips (however many you want)
    1 large onion, quartered
    plenty of cold water

    Scrub and peel the potatoes, carrots, and parsnips, and cut into very large chunks. Set aside.

    Remove corned beef from brine; do not rinse. Discard the brine.

    Place the beef in a large pot. Add enough cold water to cover it by about 1/2 an inch.

    Add the 3 Tablespoons of fresh pickling spice and the bay leaves, and bring to a boil.

    Boil gently for about 2 1/2 to 3 hours, or until beef is tender. It will look gray, not pink, because there's no saltpeter (potassium nitrate or sodium nitrate) in it.

    Add vegetables in the last 1/2 hour of cooking, so that they don't turn to mush (or boil them in some of the broth in a separate pot after the beef has cooked).

    Allow beef to cool in the broth, then drain, carve, and serve with grainy mustard and vegetables.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
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    Here's another one that cures faster:

    http://wwjtv.com/etc/Corned.Beef.Recipe.2.943591.html

    This is more what my family's butcher did when I was a kid....except with the bottom round cut.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    USA
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    I know salt peter is bad as far as nitrates are concerned but does it effect flavor?
    "It's always controls"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    Here's another one that cures faster:

    http://wwjtv.com/etc/Corned.Beef.Recipe.2.943591.html

    This is more what my family's butcher did when I was a kid....except with the bottom round cut.
    Ive tried a similar one to this. Its ok kinda like Arbys corned beef. Just does not get that nice tang that a good corned beef has but if time is not on your side it is still pretty good, if you like corned beef like I do.
    "It's always controls"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    Colorado flatland native
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    3 Years ago there was a long one. I pull it up evey year to read snippits. Specially Dices corned beef recipe. Good tips there. Bet he's pretty darn good at it. http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....ht=corned+beef
    My doctor gave me six months to live, but when I couldn't pay the bill he gave me six months more.
    Walter Matthau

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by skwsproul View Post
    I know salt peter is bad as far as nitrates are concerned but does it effect flavor?
    YES!!! IT DOES.... you must use a cure with pink salt 25 grams per gallon, a 2/1 ratio salt/sugar (brown). I use a home made pickling spice with some juniper berries. I use a fresh beef brisket from walmart $1.75 a pound... I cure totally submurged in fridge for days...then your ready to boil it. If you hot smoke it now it will become pastrami
    I cure my own sausages, franks, bacon, ham (a little difficult because of bone sour) you name it fermented sausage is tricky but well worth it

    Making corned beef/pastrani without curing salt is like eating an uncured hot dog

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    16
    [QUOTE=icemeister;2784822]This is a copy of a recipe that is just like what I do (I like the Bottom Round though):

    Traditional, pink-colored corned beef is chock-full of nitrates and nitrites. Grey corned beef may not look as appetizing, but it's alot healthier


    Wait a sec...the jury is still out on the nitite debate...nitrite is produced in the body naturally and many NATURAL foods are loaded with it , spinach for example don't feel guilty about eating your share of nitrites people with kidney/liver issues should be more concerned. just my 2 cents

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    677
    All I know is my wife made some corned beef and cabbage for st. Paddy's day using her grandmother's recipe...she slow cooks it in a crock pot and the meat just come apart and melts in your mouth. Kids won't eat it though...oh, well...more for me
    B-

    Anything is possible with God

    Fortunately I keep my feathers numbered for just such an emergency - F. Leghorn

    Ain't I a stinker - B. Bunny

    \m/ (>.<) \m/ ROCK HARD!!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    5,174
    this is one of my favorite meals.i try to make it about once a month.i like all ways, but i like it best on the grill. i take a flat cut seasoned brisket, use the seasoning packet and some extra garlic, corriander, pepper corns and bay leaf, put it in some water with a little beef paste, bring it to a hard boil and then turn it down to simmer for a while. i then cool the liquid (so the meat won't cook). drop the brisket in and let it set as long as i can. usually at least 4 hours. sometimes i will inject it. then on the grill it goes. i use mostly lump charcoal with a few briquetts added for longer heat. after about 2 hours i have to add charcoal. i have the luxury of having a duel fuel grill(built it myself) so if i need a little longer at the end i turn the gas on. i will only put smoking wood in a couple times. i am impressed at how good and tender this comes out. not a bit dry and that was my concern the first time. try it out.

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