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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    115
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    P-Trap on a down flow system

    I have a down flow system (ie: a furnace on top of an a-coil) and I noticed that it does not have a p-trap on the condensation line. Given that it is a down flow setup it appears the trap would have to go through the floor into the crawl and back out again. Is there a solution for this issue besides an electric pump?

    If I live in an area that is mostly requiring heat is there any water going down this line? I am assuming that there is only water buildup when AC is used.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Biloxi, Ms.
    Posts
    178
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    The drain doesn't have to be trapped for it to drain. There may be another reason to trap the drain. The a/c coil only drains in the cooling cycle.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    115
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    Quote Originally Posted by ball a/c View Post
    The drain doesn't have to be trapped for it to drain. There may be another reason to trap the drain. The a/c coil only drains in the cooling cycle.
    Sorry, I may have mislead you. I have a heat pump. If in my area I am predominately in heat mode then am I losing a lot of conditioned air through the condensate line unnecessarily? Do I need a condensate line if my system is set to heat only?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Biloxi, Ms.
    Posts
    178
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    Quote Originally Posted by jechow View Post
    Sorry, I may have mislead you. I have a heat pump. If in my area I am predominately in heat mode then am I losing a lot of conditioned air through the condensate line unnecessarily? Do I need a condensate line if my system is set to heat only?
    We may not be understanding each other. If you never use the cooling, you don't have to have a drain. If you truly have a heat pump, the inside unit is an air handler and the coil is in the negative part of the a/h and needs a trap to drain. If the coil is in the positive part of the a/h (downstream) it doesn't have to be trapped. I guess if you never used a/c, you could plug the drain. In my world, when we say furnace, we mean gas heat. Have a good day

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,905
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    ac or haet pump or both.
    it is counterflow and in a positive pressure,
    you do not need to trap it for any reason!
    I WILL SELL WORK,GENERATE BUSINESS, GO GET NEW CUSTOMERS!
    YOU SHUT THE HELL UP AND QUIT RUNNING YOUR MOUTH!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Smithfield,NC
    Posts
    22
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    P-trap

    There will be some conditioned air lost through the condensate line during the heat cycle, most accept this as a neccessary evil.The condensate line could be capped during the heat cycle to avoid this if you are vigilant in removing it when cooling is needed.

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