Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    386

    Zone Damper for Humidifying

    I have a 2300 sq. ft. 1.5 story home (slab) with a Honeywell TrueSteam 9-gallon humdifier and no zoning. The home has an infiltration rate of 0.37 ACH, so it's not the tightest house, but it's also not loose either. I usually keep the humidifier set to 40% RH, and it will run for several hours from time to time, depending on how cold/dry it is outside.

    I wanted to see if I could bring the house up to 45% RH last night. I noticed that it seemed to take quite a while to move the humidity up. The thermostat (VisionPro IAQ) is downstairs, and it was reading 41% humidity, so I decided to take the inside weather station upstairs and see what the humidity was up there. I put it in one of the bedrooms and it was reading 48%. When it's downstairs, it reads exactly what the VisionPro t-stat reads. This leads me to believe that much of the steam from the TrueSteam is going upstairs, and less of it is going to the downstairs branch.

    So, my question is, can a zone damper be installed so that the upstairs branch is closed when the call for humidity occurs, but in non-heating mode? I want the zone open if there is a call to heat, but when there is no call for heat, but a call for humidity, I want the zone closed. Is something like this possible? Or does someone have a suggestion on how to make sure an equal amount of steam is fed to both branches?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Sounds like you need better circulation throughout the home to even things out. the humidty was liekly lower downstair because someone probably took a shower upstairs, and you breath out a lot of moisture all evening when sleeping (I'm assuming the full baths and bedrroms are upstairs).

    Are you running the fan all the time? Is there a downstairs and upstairs return?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Also, if the ACH is 0.37, in the winter you will draw in dry outside air in the lower parts of the home and the warmer air will exit upstairs. This is a "chimney effect". Warm air rises.

    So again, your best bet is to better circulate the air to mix the upstairs and downstairs air.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    386
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Sounds like you need better circulation throughout the home to even things out. the humidty was liekly lower downstair because someoen rpobably too ka shower upstairs, and you breath out a lot of moisture all evening when sleeping (I'm assuming the full baths and bedrroms are upstairs).

    Are you running the fan all the time? Is there a downstairs and upstairs return?
    3 bedrooms upstairs, but the master is downstairs and that's where we sleep. We also shower downstairs. We spend the majority of our time downstairs. We don't run the fan all the time, but the humidifier had been running for several hours when I took the measurements, so that should have given pretty good circulation. There are 4 returns upstairs (one in each bedroom, plus one in the hallway), and there are 3 downstairs (the one in the living room is much larger than the other 6). So, circulation should not be an issue.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,803
    Is the upstairs the same temp as the downstairs, or is it warmer, or cooler then the downstairs.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    386
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Is the upstairs the same temp as the downstairs, or is it warmer, or cooler then the downstairs.
    It's usually about 1 degree cooler upstairs.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,803
    What you want to do, can be done.
    But not as easy as you might first think.

    You might want to consider zoning the home.
    If you use the W8835 evirozone, it can handle humidity control for each zone.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    What you want to do, can be done.
    But not as easy as you might first think.

    You might want to consider zoning the home.
    If you use the W8835 evirozone, it can handle humidity control for each zone.
    I had a local HVAC shop install the envirazone package (2 vision pro stats, 2 zone dampers, 1 outdoor temp sensor, and W8835 zone board) and asked him about zoned humidity control and he said it couldn't do this. I read up on the Envirazone package and didn't see anything in the documentation either. I have a 2 story home with a vision pro IAQ on each floor to control each zone (2 zone dampers on my supply). Only the vision pro stat on my main floor has the ability to control humidity. If you could point me to some documentation that shows how to configure it to control the humidity per each zone, I would really like to read up and make it happen.
    -D in MN

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,803
    Quote Originally Posted by dgbehrends View Post
    If you could point me to some documentation that shows how to configure it to control the humidity per each zone, I would really like to read up and make it happen.

    Can't do it with your zone system.

    With the OP's current current single zone system. It can have a damper and control added on to it. Since its not zoned.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,664
    Almost anything can be done and this could be done. But it isn't going to be easy and sure as heck isn't going to be cheap. I would go buy a stand alone humidifier and put it in whatever room you want if the humidity level means that much to you. You'll come out a lot cheaper by doing this.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event