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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    447

    Question Teach me about disposable pleated filters

    Questions:

    1. Given the same materials, is it correct to say that a 2" thick filter will last twice as long and have half of the pressure drop of a 1" filter?

    2. What minimum MERV is sufficient to prevent mold from growing on evaporator coils?

    3. How can 2 new filters of the same thickness and MERV rating have different pressure drops?

    4. Who makes 2", 4" and 6" thick filter grilles?

    5. What filter brand is the best value (i.e. best quality for the price)?

    6. How much pressure drop do you consider acceptable in a new filter?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
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    2,903
    Questions:

    1. Given the same materials, is it correct to say that a 2" thick filter will last twice as long and have half of the pressure drop of a 1" filter?

    - Not necessarily, you have to consider media surface area.


    2. What minimum MERV is sufficient to prevent mold from growing on evaporator coils?

    - I don't think any filter alone can prevent mold from growing on an evap coil. Get a mid range filter, and replace it as required.


    3. How can 2 new filters of the same thickness and MERV rating have different pressure drops?

    - Different material

    4. Who makes 2", 4" and 6" thick filter grilles?

    - google it

    5. What filter brand is the best value (i.e. best quality for the price)?

    - That depends on who you ask


    6. How much pressure drop do you consider acceptable in a new filter?

    - I think "acceptable pressure drop" greatly varies between systems
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    447
    - Not necessarily, you have to consider media surface area.

    Given the same materials and construction, doesn't a 2" thick filter have exactly twice the area of a 1" filter?

    - google it

    I did - nothing came up.

    - That depends on who you ask

    I'm asking you and everyone else here who knows more than I do.

    - I think "acceptable pressure drop" greatly varies between systems

    Alright, let's say the system is a Ruud UBHC-17J11NFD air handler over a Ruud RCBA-3765G indoor coil.

  4. #4

    go to

    dirtyfilters.com

    Camfil Farr rocks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    91
    Get a middle of the line one and change them often.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bristol Va.
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by charles2 View Post
    - - I think "acceptable pressure drop" greatly varies between systems

    Alright, let's say the system is a Ruud UBHC-17J11NFD air handler over a Ruud RCBA-3765G indoor coil.
    pressure drop takes into consideration size and design of your ducts, supply grilles and return grilles not mentioning the evap. coil and of course your filter.

    if your system has a high pressure drop of say over 1.5" w.c. then you can't use a pleated filter as it will be too restrictive. on the other hand if your pressure drop is low say .5 " w.c. then you can use a more restrictive filter.

    so call out your contractor and ask them to check the presure drop of your system and then you will have your answer. to what is acceptable pressure drop.

    dogboy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,550
    Get a good mid-grade filter. Go to Home Depot and don't buy the 59 cent filter or the $15 filter. Buy the $3-$8 filter and you should be ok. If you're concerned about mold growth, put a UV light in. Once you pay the initial installation fee. There will be an annual cost to replace the bulbs as well. It isn't cheap, but they do work.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Cedar Grove, Wi-Sheboygan
    Posts
    1,582
    I have to ask a ? about those UV lights, there;s many here that claim they work and there's others who say they do nothing, so the real question is are UV light's nothing more than say a placebo affect to the individual or is it more of a peace of mind type thing. And if they really do work how would one know if they should have one installed ?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,550
    Quote Originally Posted by DanW13 View Post
    I have to ask a ? about those UV lights, there;s many here that claim they work and there's others who say they do nothing, so the real question is are UV light's nothing more than say a placebo affect to the individual or is it more of a peace of mind type thing. And if they really do work how would one know if they should have one installed ?
    We've installed many and they seem to keep the inside of the coil area cleaner. I put one in my house several years ago and my wife's allergies got significantly better. I did something stupid about 2 years ago. We just installed new bulbs in a system and the homeowner complained that there was a burning smell in the house. I took them out while they were on to make sure we didn't get mastic on them or something. It was out for maybe 10 seconds, it burned my eyes whereas I couldn't even open them up later that night, it felt like sand was poured in them. I called the manufacturer as to the burning smell and they said that was normal for about 24 hours, the old ones had lost their "punch" and the new ones were killing off the new growth. I personally think they work.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    It was out for maybe 10 seconds, it burned my eyes whereas I couldn't even open them up later that night, it felt like sand was poured in them.
    When you develop cataracts you'll know why.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,070
    Quote Originally Posted by DanW13 View Post
    I have to ask a ? about those UV lights, there;s many here that claim they work and there's others who say they do nothing, so the real question is are UV light's nothing more than say a placebo affect to the individual or is it more of a peace of mind type thing. And if they really do work how would one know if they should have one installed ?
    Warning! Scientific hypothesis only. This is purely speculation based upon my research experience in bacteriology and virology using UV sterilization hoods. I suspect the UV light in the coil case works in killing stationary mold ansd spores because the UV exposure is continuous. I cannot fathom how the lights in the return ducts have any effect on moving bacteria, etc, in the air as the exposure time has to be way too short (less than a second at typical duct air velocities).

    Anybody have any reliable data on either of these hypotheses?

    Keith

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bristol Va.
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    I did something stupid about 2 years ago. We just installed new bulbs in a system and the homeowner complained that there was a burning smell in the house. I took them out while they were on to make sure we didn't get mastic on them or something. It was out for maybe 10 seconds, it burned my eyes whereas I couldn't even open them up later that night, it felt like sand was poured in them. I called the manufacturer as to the burning smell and they said that was normal for about 24 hours, the old ones had lost their "punch" and the new ones were killing off the new growth. I personally think they work.
    How are your eyes now?

    dogboy

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Quote Originally Posted by sktn77a View Post
    Warning! Scientific hypothesis only. This is purely speculation based upon my research experience in bacteriology and virology using UV sterilization hoods. I suspect the UV light in the coil case works in killing stationary mold ansd spores because the UV exposure is continuous. I cannot fathom how the lights in the return ducts have any effect on moving bacteria, etc, in the air as the exposure time has to be way too short (less than a second at typical duct air velocities).

    Anybody have any reliable data on either of these hypotheses?

    Keith
    So the question is, how long of a exposure is required and at what distance and intensity? This is probably something that's been debated in the IAQ forum for a while. The best design would have the bulbs in parallel with the airflow on the sides of the duct with a reflective surface on all sides of the duct. I think placement near the coils and drain pan ultimately is the best option.

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